With This Din, I Thee Wed: Video Stirs Virginia Neighbor’s Dispute

By Simon Veazey
Simon Veazey
Simon Veazey
Freelance Reporter
Simon Veazey is a UK-based journalist who has reported for The Epoch Times since 2006 on various beats, from in-depth coverage of British and European politics to web-based writing on breaking news.
September 24, 2018 Updated: September 24, 2018

Nestled in the peaceful Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia, the community of Catawba on the Appalachian trail should be the ideal of peace and quiet.

But two neighbors with very different businesses are struggling to co-exist—because of mutual complaints about noise.

Litigation is now pending in the dispute between an idilic Virginia countryside wedding venue, and a nearby equestrian center, according to local media.

A video that captured a motorized trimmer droning through a wedding ceremony has stirred the issue on social media.

DJ Kidd Carter claims that whenever he attended a wedding at Triple J Farms in Catawba, he noticed the neighboring horse stable would “purposefully” disrupt ceremonies as part of an attempt to put the wedding venue of business—something the stable owners categorically deny.

Carter posted a video of one wedding ceremony, showing someone cutting back grass using a motorized trimmer while a bride and groom can be seen at a wedding ceremony with guests in the neighboring field.

“Every time it’s the same,” said Carter, who is president of Blue Ridge Entertainment, according to VirginiaFirst news site. “Right before the ceremony starts there’s a bunch of noise that happens across the street. Whether it be a trimmer, a tractor, a mower, a bush hog, whatever it is to disrupt these folks’ ceremonies.”

Screenshot of wedding at Triple-J-Farms
A wedding ceremony at Tripe J Farms, Catawba, Va., during which a motorized trimmer can seen be heard nearby in a video posted to Facebook on Sept. 17, 2018. (Kidd Carter via Storyful)

But not all of the social comments on Carter’s video rallied behind the wedding venue; many locals noted that the wedding celebrations too, were known for their disruptive noise.

Others said that they had attended other weddings at the same venue that had been similarly disrupted.

The owner of the stables deny deliberately disrupting the ceremonies.

The owners for the venue haven’t spoken out, citing pending litigation.

‘Our Farming Practice Has Not Changed’

According to VirginFirst, Triple J Farm Events issued this statement:

“Triple J Farm Events has been advised not to comment because of ongoing litigations, but would like to apologize for any stress this has caused any future brides”. I promise your wedding day will be beautiful and perfect. No bride has ever left unhappy.”

Catawba Equestrian Center said any disruption had been coincidental and that their routine has remained the same for the last 16 years.

“Our farming practice has not changed,” Deborah Caldwell-Bono told VirgiaFirst. “And unfortunately for them, Saturday afternoon is when they have chosen to have these events right where we do the majority of our work most of the time.”

“So, is there an inherent conflict in that? Yea. Is it our fault? No,” said Caldwell-Bono.

“I feel terrible for those people that are having the weddings when it does happen that way, but Triple J holds the key to resolving this,” said Caldwell-Bono.

Carter said he did not intend for people to leave negative comments about the horse stables on social media and hopes the businesses can co-exist.

Some locals also encouraged the two businesses to find a settlement.

“No one communicates correctly anymore,” wrote one Facebook user. “Everyone has to be right and no one else’s points of view matter. That’s their problem on both sides! They need to sit down with a mediator and work out their problems with civility.”

Another user wrote, “Just be nice, people. Wish people well on the first day of their marriage. Show kindness and understanding for people who are caught in the middle (the newlyweds).”

Simon Veazey
Freelance Reporter
Simon Veazey is a UK-based journalist who has reported for The Epoch Times since 2006 on various beats, from in-depth coverage of British and European politics to web-based writing on breaking news.