Video: Man Is Surprised When Trying to Remove a Fallen Tree

September 6, 2017 Updated: November 28, 2017

After using a chain saw to cut a fallen tree, a man—and onlookers—got a surprise: the tree sprang back into its original place.

While some people claim it’s “magic,” it’s really just simple physics. The tree’s root and base weigh more than the top of the tree after it was cut down.

“My friend was cutting a fallen tree in my backyard and the tree went back to its place!” wrote Paul Firbas, who uploaded the clip online.

The video goes to show that logging and tree removal are dangerous jobs.

According to CNN Money, which named logging as the most dangerous job in the United States, “when loggers use handheld power saws, they’re much more vulnerable to injury from falling tree limbs and dangerous equipment.”

“Those daily threats make logging the most dangerous job in the country, with 91.3 deaths per 100,000 workers in 2013, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics,” CNN said.

The BLS’s Census of Fatal Occupation Injuries states that common injuries like falling branches and rough terrain can easily lead to death.

In 2015, the latest figures to date, there were 4,836 fatal work injuries, not counting members of the U.S. armed forces. Most of the jobs where fatalities were most frequent were done by men.

After logging, fishing was the second-most dangerous job in the United States, with a rate of 55 deaths per 100,000 workers, CNBC reported.

Fisherman Ron Onorato catches a bluefish in the waters off the Montauk shore in Long Island, New York, using traditional rod-and-reel methods. (Benjamin Chasteen/The Epoch Times)
Fisherman Ron Onorato catches a bluefish in the waters off the Montauk on Long Island, New York, using traditional rod-and-reel methods. (Benjamin Chasteen/The Epoch Times)

Third was aircraft pilots and flight engineers, with 40 deaths per 100,000.

Bright lights assumed to be lasers aimed into the cockpit of airplanes present a growing problem for pilots. (Yoshikazu Tsuno/Getty Images)
(Yoshikazu Tsuno/Getty Images)

Fourth was roofers at a rate of just under 40 per 100,000.

(Jom at German Wikipedia)
(Jom at German Wikipedia)

And fifth was refuse and recyclable material collectors (garbage men) with a rate of 39 per 100,000 deaths.

PILED UP: The Department of Sanitation will resume trash pickup in New York City on Monday. Collection was suspended due to the snowstorm that hit the city on Dec. 26. (Phoebe Zheng/The Epoch Times)
The Department of Sanitation will resume trash pickup in New York City on Monday. Collection was suspended due to the snowstorm that hit the city on Dec. 26. (Phoebe Zheng/The Epoch Times)