UK Airports Closed Due to Iceland Volcano Ash Cloud

May 16, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Passengers wait for information at Manchester Airport, in Manchester, after the airport was closed following a further disruption due to volcanic ash on May 16, 2010. Thousands of passengers were being re-routed on buses via other airports or having their flights canceled. (Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images)
Passengers wait for information at Manchester Airport, in Manchester, after the airport was closed following a further disruption due to volcanic ash on May 16, 2010. Thousands of passengers were being re-routed on buses via other airports or having their flights canceled. (Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images)
Many airports in Britain were closed on Sunday due to an ash cloud spewing from an Icelandic volcano.

According to the U.K. Civil Aviation Authority, most airports in the no-fly zone will be closed in England, including London Heathrow, London City, and Shoreham; as well as all airfields in Northern Ireland, Scottish Western Isles, and Oban.

Civil aviation officials said the two atmospheric research aircraft from the U.K. and Germany flew on Sunday to investigate the volcanic ash plume moving over Britain. Both aircraft found an extensive area of ash between 15,000 feet and 20,000 feet covering central and northern U.K., and drifting south.

The Icelandic Meteorological Office states that there are no signs indicating the eruption from the Eyjafjallajökull volcano is about to end, as the situation remains dynamic.

According to forecasts, the ash cloud is expected to clear U.K. airspace on Tuesday, with the help of south and west winds on Monday.

The U.K. Met Office will provide forecasts every six hours, giving an 18-hour prediction of where the volcanic ash cloud is and where the different levels of volcanic ash lie.

Airlines asked passengers to check information about their flights online, or to call the airports directly.

The ash cloud spewing from Iceland’s volcano affected European flights in early May and caused the cancellation of some transatlantic operations.

Last month, European airspace experienced more than a week of closures due to a giant ash cloud spewing from the same volcano. It canceled more than 100,000 flights and affected more than 10 million passengers.