Tornado Death Confirmed as Violent Storms Smack the South

February 24, 2019 Updated: February 24, 2019

COLUMBUS, Mississippi—Weekend storms raked parts of the Southeast, leaving deaths and injuries in their wake as a tornado smashed into a commercial district in a small Mississippi city and drenching rains fed a rising flood threat.

A woman was killed when a tornado hit Columbus, Mississippi, and a man died when he drove into floodwaters in Tennessee, officials said.

Columbus Mayor Robert Smith Sr. said 41-year-old Ashley Glynell Pounds of Tupelo and her husband were renovating a house Saturday evening, and when the husband went to get them something to eat, the building collapsed and killed her.

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Tornado strewn debris and fallen trees take their toll in this Columbus, Miss., neighborhood, Sunday morning, Feb. 24, 2019. At least one person was killed among the shattered businesses and wrecked homes that dotted the South as severe storms followed a weekend of drenching rains and a rising flood threat. (Rogelio V. Solis/AP)

Smith said 12 other people were injured, but the injuries did not appear to be major. City spokesman Joe Dillon said the tornado also seriously damaged a school and two community center buildings.

In Knox County, Tennessee, officials said a man died after his vehicle became submerged in high water. The sheriff’s office says emergency crews got the man out of his vehicle and took him to a hospital, but he was later pronounced dead.

The tornado Saturday afternoon in Columbus was confirmed on radar, said meteorologist Anna Wolverton with the National Weather Service in Jackson. She told The Associated Press that experts would be headed Sunday to the east Mississippi city of about 23,000 people to gauge the tornado’s intensity.

Residents of one street on the east side of Columbus were out early Sunday morning with chain saws, clearing away branches of the many trees that had snapped or were uprooted in the storm. Metal siding and roofing material was scattered throughout the neighborhood of older homes. While the houses generally remained standing, sheds and outbuildings were mostly demolished.

Lee Lawrence, who said he has been selling used cars for decades in Columbus, told The Associated Press that four buildings on his car lot were destroyed. He said trees toppled across vehicles and car windows were blown out.

A 1923 Studebaker, left and a 1930 Chevrolet Paddy Wagon are exposed at Lawrence Motors along highway 50 in Columbus, Miss., after a tornado struck the area, on Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. (Jim Lytle/AP)

Lawrence said he was at home getting ready to take a bath when the storm struck.

“The wind all of a sudden just got so strong and it was raining so much you could hardly see out the door, and I could hear a roaring. Evidently it came close,” said Lee.

“It will be a start-over deal,” Lawrence said. “I can’t say it will come back better or stronger, but we’ll come back.”

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A large tree is down into one of several buildings, housing antique cars at Lawrence Motors on highway 50 in Columbus, Miss., after a tornado struck the area on Feb. 23, 2019. (Jim Lytle/AP)

Firefighters and law enforcement officers cordoned off the area, and power was out in the area.

Elsewhere around the South, homes, highways, parks and bridges were flooded or put out of commission amid the heavy rains and severe storms. News outlets report that water rescues have been performed in some Middle Tennessee counties. Flash flood warnings and watches remained in place throughout the South and one Mississippi community reported large hail.

Interstate 40 near the Tennessee line with North Carolina was closed by a rockslide, one of the dozens of roads and highways shut down throughout the region, transportation officials said.

Officials said a mudslide destroyed a Subway restaurant in Signal Mountain, Tennessee. No injuries were reported.

In Bruce, Mississippi, rivers broke flood stage and flash floods poured into homes and businesses. News outlets report that officials in Grenada, Mississippi, declared a local state of emergency after dozens of streets and homes flooded. A 6-mile stretch of the Natchez Trace Parkway was closed in Mississippi after water covered part of the road.

The National Weather Service had issued a flash flood warning for northwestern Lafayette County in Mississippi after emergency officials reported that a local dam was at risk of failing. Meteorologist Kole Fehling says emergency officials reported the threat involved the Audubon Dam, which blocks a creek on the north side of Oxford and a subdivision.

Weather officials said the storm’s impact stretched from eastern Arkansas to northern Georgia and beyond. Alabama’s governor declared a state of emergency in several counties, hoping to speed recovery in event of damages.

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Tin from nearby buildings sits in a tree above a destroyed vacant commercial structure along highway 50 in Columbus, Miss., after a tornado struck the area on Feb. 23, 2019. (Jim Lytle/AP)

Kentucky announced Friday that it was closing the U.S. 51 bridge over the Ohio River to Cairo, Illinois, because of flooding on the southern approach. The bridge, which carries 4,700 vehicles a day, is likely to stay closed until Thursday, and possibly longer.

Near Jamestown, Kentucky, the Army Corps of Engineers said it was increasing releases from the Wolf Creek Dam on the Cumberland River. Areas downstream of the dam, from Rowena to Burkesville, could be affected by flooding as a result, officials said.

The Ohio River at Cairo is predicted to crest Sunday at its third-highest level ever recorded, and stay that high into next week. The Tennessee River near Savannah, Tennessee, also is forecast to crest at near-record levels.

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