Taiwan to Clamp Down on Chinese Counterfeit Products Bearing Taiwanese Labels

May 25, 2010 4:20 pm Last Updated: October 1, 2015 8:03 pm

These days 'Made in Taiwan' often means 'Made in China,' as more counterfeit products are being sold with Taiwanese labels.  (LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images)
These days 'Made in Taiwan' often means 'Made in China,' as more counterfeit products are being sold with Taiwanese labels. (LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images)
These days “Made in Taiwan” often means “Made in China”, as more counterfeit products are being sold with Taiwanese labels.

“Agencies under the ministry, including the Bureau of Foreign Trade, the Industrial Development Bureau, and the Bureau of Standards, Metrology, and Inspection, have formed a special investigative team to crack down on commercial piracy,” Vice Minister of Economic Affairs Lin Sheng-chung said, reports the Taiwan Times.

The report discloses Lin as saying the Ministry will detail its stance and measures to wipe out counterfeit products from China at a later news conference.

“The Ministry has a well-devised framework to cope with problems related to the entry of counterfeit goods from China,” said Lin, adding that the ministry has consistently attached great importance to the issue and has upgraded the rank of officials responsible for the task.

Taiwan’s southern traditional industries, suffused with misgivings about their future, bombarded the Ma administration for indulging floods of Chinese counterfeit products in local markets, according to a Liberty Times report.

The Taiwan Times reports that while anti-Chinese protests and riots flare across local industries, Deputy Minister of Economic Affairs Liang Kuo-hsing announced that the government will actively promote the “MIT” quality mark on local products, making them clearly distinguishable from Chinese counterfeits. More than 10,000 items will be marked with the “MIT” by the end of this year with an expected 20,000 more to be added next March.

Bloomberg reports Taiwan’s exports climbed for a sixth month in April as the recovery of the global economy boosted demand for the island’s computers and television screens.

Meanwhile, trade between China and Taiwan has continued to increase, despite political tensions. China does not accept Taiwan’s independence stance, claiming it to be part of the mainland.

Bloomberg also reports that, according to the ministry, exports to China, Taiwan’s biggest overseas market, advanced 61.6 percent from a year earlier after an 81.7 percent increase in March. Shipments to the United States climbed 29.8 percent after increasing 19.5 percent in March. Sales to Europe gained 37.6 percent, with a 40.7 percent rise.