Syria Aid Convoys Prepare to Head to Besieged Areas

February 17, 2016 Updated: February 17, 2016

DAMASCUS, Syria—Trucks loaded with humanitarian aid were expected to head out to five besieged areas in Syria on Wednesday, part of an effort described by a Russian official as a first step toward implementation of an agreement reached among world powers in Munich last week.

U.N. envoy Staffan de Mistura has been trying to secure aid deliveries to improve the chances of restarting peace talks before the end of February. But those efforts have been clouded by the intense fighting north of Aleppo, where various forces backed by regional and international rivals are clashing over a crucial strip of land linking Syria’s largest city to the border with Turkey.

The violence in Aleppo and lack of improvement on the humanitarian front led to the collapse of indirect talks between the Syrian government and its opponents in Geneva earlier this month.

The U.S., Russia and other world powers agreed last week on ceasing hostilities within a week, the delivery of urgently needed aid to besieged areas of Syria and a call to return to peace talks in Geneva.

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Gennady Gatilov said Wednesday that “the implementation of the Munich agreements on Syrian settlement has started.”

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Gennady Gatilov (C) arrives to meet with the US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and the UN-Arab League envoy for Syria, on the Syrian peace talks at the United Nations headquarters on February 13, 2014 in Geneva.(Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images)
Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Gennady Gatilov (C) arrives to meet with the US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and the UN-Arab League envoy for Syria, on the Syrian peace talks at the United Nations headquarters on February 13, 2014 in Geneva.(Philippe Desmazes/AFP/Getty Images)

He said that a working group on humanitarian access to the besieged cities has met and is set to again meet Thursday. He said it will discuss practical issues related to the aid delivery.

“It’s important that the Syrian government has officially declared that it would provide access to seven besieged cities,” Gatilov said, according to Interfax.

Gatilov also shrugged off German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s proposal to consider a no-fly zone over Syria, saying it can only be done with Damascus’ consent.

He said that any no-fly zone would need to be approved by the Syrian government and endorsed by the U.N. Security Council.

Russian warplanes have been bombarding militant positions around Aleppo in support of a Syrian army offensive. Russia has said it will continue to strike extremists in Syria despite a planned truce.

Merkel said in an interview published Monday that it would be “helpful” if there were areas where no side would carry out aerial bombardments — “a kind of no-fly zone.”

In Damascus on Tuesday, de Mistura suggested that humanitarian aid would be allowed into several besieged areas Wednesday, calling it the “duty of the government of Syria.”

“Tomorrow we test this,” he said after meeting with Syria’s foreign minister. The U.N. later announced the government of President Bashar Assad has approved access to seven such areas across the country and that convoys would head out in the coming days.

The Syrian foreign ministry hit back Wednesday, saying “we do not wait for anyone to remind us of our duties toward our people.”

“In fact, the Syrian government is the one that needs to test the credibility of the U.N. envoy,” a statement said.

Still, the convoys appeared to be preparing to head to besieged areas Wednesday. At least 16 trucks were parked on the side of the highway at the entrance to Damascus, waiting to leave for the besieged rebel-held towns of Madaya, Zabadani and Moadamiyeh near the capital.

According to the agreement, aid would simultaneously be delivered to two communities in the northern Idlib province that are besieged by rebels.

The convoys represent the third humanitarian aid delivery to the besieged communities after two similar efforts last month.

The U.N. estimates that 18 Syrian communities are besieged, affecting around half a million people.