Southeast Still Shut Down by Winter Storm

January 11, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Todd Carnes, an employee of Crosland, spreads salt on the sidewalks surrounding The Catalyst apartments January 10, 2010 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Davis Turner/Getty Images)
Todd Carnes, an employee of Crosland, spreads salt on the sidewalks surrounding The Catalyst apartments January 10, 2010 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Davis Turner/Getty Images)
ATLANTA—Travel disruptions continued across the Southeast on Tuesday due to the winter storm that hit over the past few days.

Though snow stopped, it was followed by freezing rain on Monday. Roads remained icy and schools were closed. Temperatures did not become warm enough to melt the accumulation. They are expected to fall into the teens on Wednesday.

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed declared a state of emergency and said in a statement, “This is a very dangerous combination, and I ask that Atlanta residents to stay off the roads, or at least drive at reduced speeds if they must go outside.”

Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson airport, usually the busiest in the world, was functioning at a much lower level than normal. According to the city of Atlanta, about 60 percent of flights were canceled on Monday and Tuesday.

Only three of ten parking lots and one of three security checkpoints were open. The airport advised travelers to contact their airlines before coming to the airport.

Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Tennessee and the Carolinas are still in official states of emergency. Because snow and ice are uncommon for the Southern states, cities and counties do not invest in equipment to remove it.

Atlanta, the major city in the region, has only 11 snow plows.

Reed said state and municipal crews are working around the clock to clear main roads and apply de-icing chemicals to bridges. The city has opened shelters for those without heat.

Trash collection, mail, and newspaper delivery are temporarily suspended in Atlanta.

According to NOAA, people throughout the region should stay off the roads if possible.

The winter storms that are affecting the Southeast are heading to the Northeast, NOAA predicted.