Senator: FBI Secret Society Held Secret Offsite Meetings, Informant Says

January 24, 2018 Last Updated: January 24, 2018

A secret society with members operating at the top levels of the FBI and Department of Justice (DOJ) held secret meetings outside of government offices, Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) told Fox News, citing an informant.

The revelation of the secret meetings comes one day after two congressmen said they saw text messages between top FBI officials discussing a “secret society” conspiring against President Donald Trump.

Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-Texas) and Rep. Trey Gowdy (R-S.C.) discovered the messages during their review of 9,500 texts sent between top FBI counterintelligence official Peter Strzok and his mistress, senior FBI lawyer Lisa Page.

Strzok and Page came under fire when texts exposing their anti-Trump bias became public. In one of the messages, the couple discussed an “insurance policy” in the event that Trump would win the presidency.

“That secret society—we have an informant that’s talking about a group that were holding secret meetings off-site,” Johnson said, according to Fox, adding, “I think there are indications there were a number of high-level FBI officials that were holding secret meetings off-site.”

Strzok and Page are under renewed scrutiny after the FBI announced that five months of their text messages went missing. Trump called the missing messages “one of the biggest stories in a long time” and Attorney General Jeff Sessions said that the DOJ will “leave no stone unturned” to recover the texts.

 

Peter Strzok (FBI)

“In one of the biggest stories in a long time, the FBI now says it is missing five months worth of lovers Strzok-Page texts, perhaps 50,000, and all in prime time,” Trump wrote on Twitter. “Wow!”

 

The missing messages and emails among top FBI officials contain conversations about initiating physical harm against Trump, according to a high-ranking FBI official who spoke to True Pundit.

“This is much larger than just texts between two FBI agents,” the official told True Pundit. “This is dangerous territory and all FBI text messages and personal phones should be examined. It would reveal some frightening conversations.”

Public statements by sitting government officials about secret societies operating within the top tiers of government in Washington are extremely rare, despite ample evidence to such groups’ existence. During the 2004 presidential race, leading candidates George W. Bush and John Kerry both admitted that they were members of Skull and Bones, a secret society founded in Yale University.

The existence of a shadowy group working against Trump became quickly apparent after his election. The president was inundated by an avalanche of leaks, reaching a rate of one per day during his first five months in office, according to a report by the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs.

Trump is the first president since John F. Kennedy to call out secret societies in public. Trump used the words “Deep State” in several tweets, including one referencing the surveillance of Trump associates.

In a landmark speech to the American Newspaper Publishers Association, Kennedy said that danger from secret societies is clear and imminent and that, “our way of life is under attack.”

“For we are opposed around the world by a monolithic and ruthless conspiracy that relies primarily on covert means for expanding its sphere of influence—on infiltration instead of invasion, on subversion instead of elections, on intimidation instead of free choice, on guerrillas by night instead of armies by day,” Kennedy said, two years before his assassination.

Evidence of bias and a potential conspiracy against Trump at the top levels of government continues to pile up. Strzok and Page were at the top tier of the FBI with then-Director James Comey, who admitted to leaking memos, at least one of which was classified, to a friend with the intention of the information reaching the press.

Revelations of Strzok’s bias against Trump also cast doubt on his work as the lead investigator in the Hillary Clinton email probe. Strzok revised a report on the investigation to remove language that could criminally implicate Clinton.

Simultaneously to reports of a secret society, numerous congressmen are calling for the release of a potentially devastating House Intelligence Committee report on abuses of government surveillance. Lawmakers are calling the content of the memo “worse than Watergate” and a “palace coup.”

Sixty-five lawmakers have called for the memo to be publicly released and more than 130 members of Congress—almost all of them Republicans—have viewed it.

The notion of a secret society operating at the top tier of government hasn’t entered the news cycle since the 2004 presidential election when Bush and Kerry admitted to their membership in Skull and Bones but would not elaborate further.

Although no evidence has yet surfaced to link Skull and Bones to the Illuminati, both groups have a unique fascination with death. Secret society researchers have long pointed to a common thread running through groups like the Illuminati, Freemasons, and Skull and Bones—all practice occult rituals.

Footage recorded outside the Skull and Bones building at Yale shows a ceremony which includes actors carrying out a staged murder while hysteric yells and shouts fill the private courtyard of the society’s building named The Tomb.

A painting inside the Skull and Bones Tomb at Yale has text that reads, in translation from German, “Who was the fool, who the wise man, beggar or king?” That phrase is parallel to the one used in a high-level Illuminati initiation ritual where an initiate is faced with a skeleton and asked, “whether that is the skeleton of a king, nobleman, or beggar?”

According to Mark Dice, a secret society researcher who spent more than a decade separating facts from fiction on the subject, writings of prominent members of the Illuminati show that the group’s members practice Luciferianism and worship Satan.

From NTD.tv

 

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