Royal Wedding: Security Forces Ready for Every Possible Attack

April 26, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Police check a scaffolding bar outside Westminster Abbey on April 26 in London. With only two full days to go before the royal wedding security checks and last-minute preparations are continuing around Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace, and on the route the couple will take. (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
Police check a scaffolding bar outside Westminster Abbey on April 26 in London. With only two full days to go before the royal wedding security checks and last-minute preparations are continuing around Westminster Abbey, Buckingham Palace, and on the route the couple will take. (Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
London’s Metropolitan Police urged the public to help with ensuring security at the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton on Friday.

“We really need you to be our eyes and our ears,” said Metropolitan Police Assistant Commissioner Lynne Owens at a press briefing on Tuesday, according to ABC News. “If you see anybody in the crowd that is acting suspiciously, please bring it to the earliest attention of our officers.”

By Friday morning, some 5,000 police officers will be on duty to ensure the wedding stays safe. As the wedding proceedings begin in Westminster Abbey on Friday morning, snipers from the Metropolitan Police will have already stationed themselves on rooftops throughout the city.

Officials have been planning the security for the big day for 22 weeks. Sixteen people have already been banned from London on Friday for known trouble-making.

Should a bomb explode along the parade route, police will usher crowds into areas that have been blocked to traffic, while ambulances will follow predetermined routes to get victims to hospitals, according to Time Magazine.

Even if terrorists launch a gun attack on the streets, armed commandos who will be located in undisclosed locations will take over the area within minutes.

“We’re at the second highest level of threat that we’ve ever been in this country, which means an attack is imminent,” said Dai Davies, former head of Scotland Yard’s Royal Protection Squad and former chief superintendent of the Met, as quoted by Time. “These threats are very real.”