Salmonella Outbreak Affects More Than 200 People Across 23 States

July 28, 2020 Updated: July 28, 2020

A salmonella outbreak is affecting people across America, according to an investigation notice issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Friday.

A total of 212 people have been affected by the outbreak of salmonella newport across 23 states, with 31 people hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

The CDC said there is no recommended food to avoid because the source of the outbreak has not yet been identified.

The CDC listed the symptoms of a salmonella infection, such as diarrhea, fever, and stomachache any time between 6 hours or 6 days after being exposed to the bacteria. Once infected, the illness usually lasts anywhere between 4 to 7 days.

Most individuals can recover from a salmonella infection without treatment, however some people may require hospitalization, as a salmonella infection can spread from the intestines into the bloodstream, as well as other parts of the body.

The CDC encouraged people to watch for symptoms of a salmonella infection, and should anyone exhibit any symptoms, they should contact medical professionals or a healthcare provider right away.

For people whose immune system is weaker, like children aged 5 and younger or people aged 65 and older, there is a chance that salmonella might develop into a more serious illness.

The CDC said the outbreak is growing quickly, having started on July 10, affecting 13 people from three different states. From July 10 to July 21, a total of 125 people were infected.

Since July 21, 87 new reports of salmonella infection were recorded, 38 of which were from eight new states: Arizona, Florida, Idaho, Maine, North Dakota, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Virginia.

The CDC is currently investigating the outbreak, and any new information will be provided as soon as it is made available.

In the meantime, the CDC advised that people wash hands and surfaces often, and wash fruits and vegetables before cutting, peeling, or eating.

Food that does not need to be cooked before consuming, such as fruit and salads, should be placed in a separate place from foods that require cooking before consuming, such as seafood, raw meat, or poultry.

The CDC advised that people cook their food at high temperatures to ensure that germs are killed before consuming. Food that can go bad quickly should be refrigerated within 2 hours, or within an hour if the temperature outside is higher than 90 degrees Fahrenheit.