Queen Elizabeth: Garden Has Hallucinogenic ‘Super Mario Bros’ Mushrooms

December 13, 2014 Updated: December 13, 2014

Hallucinogenic fly agaric, or Amanita muscaria, mushrooms were discovered in Queen Elizabeth II’s garden recently.

The red and white mushrooms–commonly associated with Super Mario Bros–are found all over the world. They can be consumed and can cause psychoactive effects and notably cause dissociative changes in perception. However, they can cause poisoning and have a different psychoactive constituent than psilocybin mushrooms, which are sold as a street drug.

The fungi were found at Buckingham Palace in London by celebrity gardener Alan Titchmarsh, according to NBC News. He found them while filming for broadcaster ITV that is to be aired on Christmas Day.

“There are several hundred fungi species in the palace garden, including a small number of naturally occurring fly agaric mushrooms,” a spokesperson for Buckingham Palace was quoted as saying. He said the fungi are beneficial for trees.

Queen Elizabeth II and the Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh say farewell to Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and his wife Ani Bambang Yudhoyono at Buckingham Palace on November 2, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Lewis Whyld - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
Queen Elizabeth II and the Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh say farewell to Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono and his wife Ani Bambang Yudhoyono at Buckingham Palace on November 2, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Lewis Whyld – WPA Pool/Getty Images)

Titchmarsh said it was a “surprise” and added that “I won’t be eating any.”

Officials say mushrooms from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens. Another official told NBC that no one at the palace would be eating them.

The mushroom’s hallucinogenic properties have long been known and it has commonly been used in rituals, namely in Siberia. A. muscaria can cause illness but are rarely fatal–unlike other species of the Amanita family like the Amanita virosa (destroying angel) or Amanita phalloides (death cap).

The Associated Press contributed to this report.