Photo Gallery: Birds of Prey at the Mamakating Library

August 19, 2015 Updated: August 21, 2015    

WURTSBORO—It’s a rare opportunity to see birds of prey up close, which is why over 50 people took the opportunity to see an eagle, owls, and hawks at the Mamakating Library on Tuesday. The birds were part of a presentation given by Bill Streeter, the director of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center in Milford, PA, which gives over 120 presentations a year.

Julia the golden eagle flapping her wings at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia has a 7-foot wing span and weighs about 14 lbs.(Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Julia the golden eagle flapping her wings at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia has a 7-foot wing span and weighs about 14 lbs.(Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Julia the golden eagle flaps her wings during a demonstration at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Her handler Bill Streeter, said he was being careless while working with her one day and her sharp talon tore through his tongue and secured it to his jaw. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Julia the golden eagle flaps her wings during a demonstration at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Her handler Bill Streeter, said he was being careless while working with her one day and her sharp talon tore through his tongue and secured it to his jaw. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

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Bill Streeter, director of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center holds up Julia, a golden eagle, at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. The name golden refers to the gold color on the back of her head, which is her hackles. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Bill Streeter, director of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center holds up Julia, a golden eagle, at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. The name golden refers to the gold color on the back of her head, which is her hackles. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Sadie the peregrine falcon in her carrying case after a demonstration on birds of prey at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Sadie the peregrine falcon in her carrying case after a demonstration on birds of prey at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Elvira the great horned owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Elvira the great horned owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Elvira the great horned owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. She doesn't like to look at people so she turns her head away from the audience.  (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Elvira the great horned owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. She doesn’t like to look at people so she turns her head away from the audience. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Mortimer the saw-whet owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Saw-whets are the third smallest owl in the U.S. and are the smallest in the northeast. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Mortimer the saw-whet owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Saw-whets are the third smallest owl in the U.S. and are the smallest in the northeast. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Mortimer the saw-whet owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Mortimer is completely blind in one eye, making it impossible for him to hunt and thus live in the wild. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Mortimer the saw-whet owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Mortimer is completely blind in one eye, making it impossible for him to hunt and thus live in the wild. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Mortimer the saw-whet owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Mortimer was rescued by a man at 4:30 a.m. on the side of a road in Cornwall, N.Y. and was brought to the Delaware Valley Raptor Center where he was rehabiliated. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Mortimer the saw-whet owl at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Mortimer was rescued by a man at 4:30 a.m. on the side of a road in Cornwall, N.Y. and was brought to the Delaware Valley Raptor Center where he was rehabiliated. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

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Julia the golden eagle at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia was hit by a car and suffered a fractured left leg and a head injury that left her blind in her right eye.  She came to the Delaware Valley Raptor Center in 2005 from a bird rescue center in Wyoming. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times).
Julia the golden eagle at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia was hit by a car and suffered a fractured left leg and a head injury that left her blind in her right eye. She came to the Delaware Valley Raptor Center in 2005 from a bird rescue center in Wyoming. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times).

 

Julia the golden eagle at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia is 20, and a bird like her in captivity could live to be 40 years old. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Julia the golden eagle at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia is 20, and a bird like her in captivity could live to be 40 years old. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Julia the golden eagle flapping her wings at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia has a 7-foot wing span and weighs about 14 lbs.(Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Julia the golden eagle flapping her wings at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. Julia has a 7-foot wing span and weighs about 14 lbs.(Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

The back of Julia the golden eagle and Bill Streeter, her handler, at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. The feathers of the golden eagle change with their age, starting out mostly white with a black tip in youth, then turning mostly brown by the age of 5 or 6. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times).
The back of Julia the golden eagle and Bill Streeter, her handler, at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. The feathers of the golden eagle change with their age, starting out mostly white with a black tip in youth, then turning mostly brown by the age of 5 or 6. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times).

 

The feet of Julia the golden eagle on the arm of her handler Bill Streeter at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015.(Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
The feet of Julia the golden eagle on the arm of her handler Bill Streeter at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015.(Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Julia the golden eagle at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. According to her handler, Julia is always one of the highlights of the show because of her size and regal appearance. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Julia the golden eagle at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. According to her handler, Julia is always one of the highlights of the show because of her size and regal appearance. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

Great horned owl Elvira spreads her wings during a demonstration at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
Great horned owl Elvira spreads her wings during a demonstration at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)

 

The crowd listens to Bill Streeter as he talks about the great horned owl he has on his wrist named Elvira at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)
The crowd listens to Bill Streeter as he talks about the great horned owl he has on his wrist named Elvira at the Mamakating Library in Wurtsboro on Aug. 18, 2015. (Holly Kellum/Epoch Times)