Ottawa Reception Celebrates Taiwan’s National Day

By Donna He
Donna He
Donna He
October 9, 2008 Updated: October 9, 2008

The Hon. Jason Kenney, Secretary of State (Multiculturalism and Canadian Identity), and Dr. David Tawei Lee, Taiwan's Representative in Canada, raise their glasses in a toast to celebrate Taiwan's National Day at a reception in Ottawa. (Donna He/The Epoch Times)
The Hon. Jason Kenney, Secretary of State (Multiculturalism and Canadian Identity), and Dr. David Tawei Lee, Taiwan's Representative in Canada, raise their glasses in a toast to celebrate Taiwan's National Day at a reception in Ottawa. (Donna He/The Epoch Times)
OTTAWA—The Taiwanese mission in Canada celebrated Taiwan’s 97th birthday with an elegant National Day reception at Ottawa’s landmark Fairmont Château Laurier hotel on Tuesday.

Taiwan’s National Day, known as “Double Ten Day” because it falls on October 10, commemorates the Wuchang Uprising of October 10, 1911 that led to the overthrow of the Qing Dynasty and the establishment of the Republic of China.

Organized by the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Canada, the reception was hosted by Dr. David Tawei Lee, Taiwan’s Representative in Canada, and his wife Mrs. Lin Chih Lee.

More than 200 guests attended the celebration. Among them were Canadian government officials, academics, representatives from Ottawa’s business circle, and members of diverse community groups.

“The Republic of China in Taiwan is the model of the struggle for freedom and democracy for Chinese people around the world,” said Dr. Lee in an interview with The Epoch Times.

“Over the past year we have experienced parliamentary and presidential elections and their process has demonstrated peace, democracy, and progress. We hope that someday a similar spirit of democracy and peace will be brought to all Chinese people in the world,” he said.
 
In his speech at the reception, Secretary of State (Multiculturalism and Canadian Identity) the Honourable Jason Kenney thanked the Taiwanese community for its contributions to Canada and noted that freedom, democracy, and respect for human rights are values shared by Canada and Taiwan.

One of the guests, Ms. Yan Mei Huang, told The Epoch Times that “in previous elections, no matter which party lost, there would be people who would feel very uncomfortable.”

However, this year when her husband returned to Taiwan to vote, he noticed that “by the day after the elections everyone was already taking down their flags and everything was very peaceful.”

“There’s a feeling that democracy has matured,” she said.

“We hope for an even smoother and more complete democratic process in Taiwan… We hope that Mainland China will also gradually step onto the path of democracy [so that] ultimately there will be one China,” said Ms. Huang.

Additional reporting by Cindy Chan.

Donna He
Donna He