The Queensland Election Is the LNP’s to Lose—and That They Can

The Liberal-National Opposition can only lose the election if it persists in preferencing the Greens Party before Labor.
The Queensland Election Is the LNP’s to Lose—and That They Can
Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk speaks during a Labor Campaign Rally in Brisbane, Australia, on May 15, 2022. (Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images)
Gabriël Moens
10/31/2023
Updated:
10/31/2023
0:00
Commentary

The three-term ruling Queensland Labor Party appears to be in turmoil.

This is demonstrated by the internecine war in the party, which surfaced during the recent holiday trip of Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk to Italy.

As reported, members of her own entourage allegedly encouraged the “absent” premier to hand over the reins of power.

Recent decisions by the Palaszczuk government have gone down poorly with voters.

For example, the decision to offer public servants, distraught over The Voice’s defeat, a week’s mourning leave on full pay, was widely ridiculed.

The government’s adoption of the Path to Treaty Act, which will establish a truth-telling commission and a treaty with Indigenous people, has been branded racially divisive and may, following the withdrawal of support from the opposition, be doomed.

The Queensland Climate Transition Bill is another ill-conceived piece of legislation that provides for the phasing out of coal, oil, and gas exports by Dec. 31, 2030. The Bill also introduces a 75 percent emissions reduction target by 2030 from 2005 levels; as well as mandating net zero by 2035.

These decisions have certainly contributed to weakening optimism around a fourth term for the Labor Party and have eviscerated the premier’s electoral appeal.

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk speaks to the media after her keynote speech at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane, Australia, on Feb. 15, 2023. (AAP Image/Darren England)
Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk speaks to the media after her keynote speech at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane, Australia, on Feb. 15, 2023. (AAP Image/Darren England)

Nevertheless, Ms. Palaszczuk has announced that she is the best person to lead Labor to a historic fourth election win in Queensland.

This is a calculated response to The Courier-Mail’s most recent YouGov poll, which revealed that Ms. Palaszczuk, for the first time since her ascension to the premiership, is no longer the preferred state leader.

Moreover, the poll also revealed that 49 percent of men and 45 percent of women believe that Queensland is heading in the wrong direction, suggesting Labor could be on track for a bruising defeat in the forthcoming election.

The Liberal National Party (LNP) opposition can only lose the election if it cripples itself.

This is possible, and may even be likely, if it persists in a proposal to preference the Greens Party before Labor on its how-to-vote cards.

Of course, the logic behind the proposed preference deal is clear: such an “alliance” would prevent Labor from picking up marginal seats.

Nevertheless, it remains risky business because it could result in the election of a Greens Party candidate, who undoubtedly would benefit from Labor preferences.

Further, if there was a need for a coalition to form government in Queensland, the Greens would most likely partner with Labor, keeping the opposition out of power for another four years.

Greens and LNP Hold Vastly Different Values

Quite apart from these practical and cynical considerations, any preference deal would be risky for the LNP because the electorate, especially its own sympathisers, might accuse the party of sacrificing its principles to gain an assumed electoral advantage to deny Labor a fourth term.

Indeed, it is baffling why the LNP would even consider an unholy alliance with the Greens—a party that is communist-friendly and, as we now know, is also Hamas-friendly.

Queensland Opposition Leader David Crisafulli is seen during question time at Queensland Parliament House in Brisbane, Australia, on Feb. 23, 2023. (AAP Image/Darren England)
Queensland Opposition Leader David Crisafulli is seen during question time at Queensland Parliament House in Brisbane, Australia, on Feb. 23, 2023. (AAP Image/Darren England)
The Greens’ lyrical admiration of Beijing was captured well by Chris Johansen writing for the Greens Western Australia, who stated that “the one-party system of China has been more successful than the multi-party systems of South Asia in raising the masses from abject poverty.”
It is interesting that the Greens maintain their admiration of the Chinese communist regime even though its policies on climate change are the opposite of those propagated by the Greens.

Indeed, while the Greens want to stop the mining and export of coal with immediate effect, China’s economy is still very much dependent on coal.

This admiration of China sits incongruously with the more balanced and realistic views of the LNP.

How then is it possible for the LNP to even consider giving the Greens Party their preferences—a party that admires an authoritarian regime and accuses Australia of being a racist country?

This is particularly so since the “miraculous” transformation of China into a world power has necessitated the adoption of disastrous air pollution and deforestation policies and has resulted in gross human rights violations.

Of course, the Greens Party’s perception of China will continue to play to its target Australian audience. But it does not hide the fact that these policies are not much more than soulless statements devoid of detail, compassion, and rationality.

It is thus to be hoped that the LNP shelves its planned “alliance” with the Greens Party because any collaboration with that party is electoral poison. hopefully, the LNP will reconsider its proposal and, in the process, confirm the continuing validity of the values upon which the party is based.

Views expressed in this article are opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of The Epoch Times.
Gabriël A. Moens AM is an emeritus professor of law at the University of Queensland, and served as pro vice-chancellor and dean at Murdoch University. In 2003, Moens was awarded the Australian Centenary Medal by the prime minister for services to education. He has taught extensively across Australia, Asia, Europe, and the United States.