‘Oh, Come On’: Man Spotted Kitesurfing in Miami During Irma

September 11, 2017 Updated: September 12, 2017

During Hurricane Irma, a man was spotted kitesurfing behind an MSNBC reporter in Miami Beach.

“Is that somebody kitesurfing behind you,” MSNBC host Alex Witt asks reporter Mariana Atencio, who was reporting from the beach.

Large waves could be seen in the background.

Witt then says, “Oh, come on!”

“That’s exactly what I wanted to show you,” Atencio responds, adding that first responders likely won’t be happy to see the man kitesurfing as a hurricane bears down.

Miami was placed under a mandatory evacuation order.

And reports say that a massive amount of flooding was reported across Miami on Sunday and Monday. Rivers of water could be seen flowing down normally bustling streets.

The Tampa skyline is seen in the background as local residents (L-R) Rony Ordonez, Jean Dejesus and Henry Gallego take photographs after walking into Hillsborough Bay ahead of Hurricane Irma in Tampa, Florida on Sept. 10, 2017. (REUTERS/Adrees Latif)
The Tampa skyline is seen in the background as local residents (L-R) Rony Ordonez, Jean Dejesus, and Henry Gallego take photographs after walking into Hillsborough Bay ahead of Hurricane Irma in Tampa, Fla., on Sept. 10, 2017. (Reuters/Adrees Latif)
Boats are seen at a marina in Coconut Grove as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida, in Miami, Florida on Sept. 10, 2017. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)
Boats at a marina in Coconut Grove, Miami as Hurricane Irma arrives in South Florida on Sept. 10, 2017. (Reuters/Carlos Barria)
A local resident walks across a flooded street in downtown Miami as Hurricane Irma arrives at south Florida on Sept. 10, 2017. (REUTERS/Carlos Barria)
A local resident walks across a flooded street in downtown Miami as Hurricane Irma arrives in South Florida on Sept. 10, 2017. (Reuters/Carlos Barria)

As of Monday afternoon, flooding was reported in Jacksonville, Florida, amid Tropical Storm Irma’s lashing winds and rain.

“Jacksonville suffered a double whammy of storm surge pushing in from the Atlantic Ocean, backing up the St. Johns River, then over 8 inches of rain that couldn’t drain to the ocean,” Weather.com senior meteorologist Jon Erdman reported.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said that people need to “get out now” if they live in evacuation Zones A or B.

Irma left more than 6 million homes and businesses without power.

Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Florida on Sept. 10, 2017. (REUTERS/Stephen Yang)
Flooding in the Brickell neighborhood as Hurricane Irma passes Miami, Fla., on Sept. 10, 2017. (Reuters/Stephen Yang)
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