NYC Mayoral Candidates Speak at Women’s Forum

By Christine Lin
Christine Lin
Christine Lin
Christine Lin is an arts reporter for the Epoch Times. She can be found lurking in museum galleries and poking around in artists' studios when not at her desk writing.
July 28, 2009 Updated: July 28, 2009
Mayoral candidate City Council Member Tony Avella. (Cliff Jia/The Epoch Times)
Mayoral candidate City Council Member Tony Avella. (Cliff Jia/The Epoch Times)

NEW YORK—Two mayoral candidates, Comptroller William Thompson and City Council Member Tony Avella, discussed their plans for improving the state of women at Pace University on Monday evening. The incumbent Michael Bloomberg was not part of the event.

The National Organization for Women's New York chapter co-hosted the talk with the university. NOW-NYC President Sonia Ossorio presided.

The questions centered around women's rights, equal pay, education, and child care. Both candidates had two minutes each to respond. Following the questions, they had the opportunity to hear and respond to concerns from the audience, most of whom were from women's groups and the Pace community.

Mayoral candidate Comptroller William Thompson. (Cliff Jia/The Epoch Times)
Mayoral candidate Comptroller William Thompson. (Cliff Jia/The Epoch Times)
While the questions from Ossorio were presented from a women's advocacy perspective, both candidates' answers alluded to a broader vision that they believe will address the issues that matter to New Yorkers both male and female.

The mayoral campaign is coming into full swing with three candidates on the table: Avella, the council member from Queens whose top issues include human rights, community-based urban planning, and affordable housing; City Comptroller Thompson, who is known for his sometimes controversial solutions to issues of public funding; and the high-budget Mayor Bloomberg whose campaign is possible because the City recently approved a third term for city politicians. New York congressman Anthony Weiner decided not to run after a long time preparing for a possible candidacy.

Ninety-nine days lie between the each candidate and the voters' final verdict at the polls on Nov. 3.

Christine Lin is an arts reporter for the Epoch Times. She can be found lurking in museum galleries and poking around in artists' studios when not at her desk writing.