Nigerian Schoolgirl Abducted by Boko Haram Found, Is Pregnant

By Denisse Moreno, Epoch Times
May 18, 2016 11:00 am Last Updated: May 18, 2016 11:00 am

A Chibok girl that was kidnapped by Boko Haram extremists in 2014 was found and reunited with her mother on May 17. The victim,now 19, is said to be pregnant.

Amina Ali Nkek, who was found by Nigerian soldiers, is the first to be freed from the mass kidnapping of 219 Chibok schoolgirls two years ago.

The girls were taken on April 14, 2014, when Boko Haram Islamic extremists broke in and firebombed the the Government Girls Secondary School at Chibok snatching 276 girls who were preparing to write science exams. Some of the victims escaped during the first hours of the abduction, but 219 remained missing.

The kidnapping of the girls sparked worldwide attention. First Lady Michelle Obama and Nobel Prize winner Malala Yousafzai supported the #BringBackOurGirls, where people and high-profile figures went on social media to condemn the act.

Nkeki was found wandering in the forest, her uncle Yakubu Nkeki told The Associated Press. She was brought back on the night of May 17 for identity verification and to return with her mother. The victim’s father died when she was in captivity.

Nkeki’s uncle said she is traumatized but otherwise fine.

He said the soldiers then took Nkeki away, apparently to a military camp in the town of Damboa.

Parents of missing Chibok schoolgirls gather to mark the one-year anniversary of the abduction of 219 schoolgirls by Boko Haram Islamists in the northeastern Nigerian city of Chibok in Borno State on April 14. (AFP/Getty Images)
Parents of missing Chibok schoolgirls gather to mark the one-year anniversary of the abduction of 219 schoolgirls by Boko Haram Islamists in the northeastern Nigerian city of Chibok on April 14. (AFP/Getty Images)

The Chibok community leader, Pogu Bitrus, said other kidnapped girls may have been rescued by soldiers hunting down the extremists in the northeastern Sambisa Forest.

Bitrus said he is working with officials to verify identities.

In April, a video by CNN appeared to show some of the kidnapped Chibok girls alive. The footage was allegedly taken at Christmastime in 2015. Some of the girls in the video were identified by their parents.

The number of children and young women kidnapped by the extremist group is not known, although it is believed to be in the thousands. Nigerian officials have reported saving thousands this year, as they push Boko Haram from towns to the Sambisa Forest.

Suicide Bombing

The 7-year-old extremist group has killed 20,000 people, and has turned to soft targets by using suicide bombers.

The number of children involved in Boko Haram suicide attacks has increased dramatically, said a UNICEF report on April 12.

The number increased from 4 in 2014—to 44 in 2015. UNICEF reported that over the past 2 years, 1 in 5 suicide bombers was a child and 75 percent of the children involved in Boko Haram attacks were girls.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.