NHC Gives Final Update on Irma, Location

September 12, 2017 Updated: September 12, 2017

Irma, which hit Florida as a Category 4 hurricane on Sunday morning, has been downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.

It has winds of 10 mph, and it’s moving north-northwest at 26 mph, the NHC said in its final update, posted at 11 a.m. ET on Tuesday.

It will bring heavy rain to the Lower Mississippi Valley and the Tennessee Valley.

Flood and coastal flood warnings are in effect across portions of Florida, the agency stated.

On Tuesday, power was restored to more than 2 million customers in Florida, the Florida Power & Light Co. said, ABC News reported. However, some 4.4 million homes and businesses remain without power, the utility said.

Robert Bonding, 30, removes carpet damaged by Hurricane Irma from The First Baptist Church in Everglades City, Florida, on Sept. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)
Robert Bonding removes carpet damaged by Hurricane Irma from The First Baptist Church in Everglades City, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)
Women walk with garbage bags for waders on a flooded street following Hurricane Irma in North Miami, Florida, on Sept. 11, 2017. (Reuters/Carlo Allegri)
Women walk with garbage bags for waders on a flooded street following Hurricane Irma in North Miami, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. (Reuters/Carlo Allegri)
A firefighter views a collapsed coastal house after Hurricane Irma passed the area in Vilano Beach, Florida on Sept. 11, 2017. (St Johns County Fire Rescue/Handout via ReuterS)
A firefighter views a collapsed coastal house after Hurricane Irma passed Vilano Beach, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. (St Johns County Fire Rescue/Handout via Reuters)
Downtown Miami on Sept. 11, 2017, after it was hit by Hurricane Irma. (The Epoch Times)
Downtown Miami on Sept. 11, 2017, after it was hit by Hurricane Irma. (The Epoch Times)

Irma killed 43 people in its rampage through the Caribbean before killing at least 11 in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina, Reuters reported.

“This is going to be a frustrating event. It’s going to take some time to let people back into their homes particularly in the Florida Keys,” said Brock Long, administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

A collapsed crane on a building under construction is pictured after passing of Hurricane Irma in Key Biscayne, Florida on Sept. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)
A collapsed crane on a building under construction is pictured after passing of Hurricane Irma in Key Biscayne, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Carlo Allegri)
Residents sit on their front porch watching water reside after Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Florida, on Sept. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)
Residents sit on their front porch after Hurricane Irma in Everglades City, Fla., on Sept. 11, 2017. (REUTERS/Bryan Woolston)

In the Florida Keys, some 25 percent of homes were destroyed, and another 65 percent suffered “major damage,” Long told the New York Times. “Basically every house in the Keys was impacted in some way or another,” he said.

Meanwhile, about 94,000 people remain in shelters across Florida.

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