New Jersey Woman Found Dead Under Snow

January 25, 2016 Updated: January 26, 2016
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MAHWAH, N.J.—Authorities say children returning home from school found the snow-covered body of a neighbor who apparently died while shoveling snow during the weekend storm.

Mahwah police say 64-year-old Mary Wall apparently died on Saturday but was not found until Monday afternoon. They say she was holding a shovel in her hand.

A cause of death has not been determined. But authorities say the death is not considered suspicious.

The children who found Wall initially thought someone had left a jacket in the snow. But they soon discovered it was Wall, whose body was barely visible amid the several inches of snow that had fallen.

People clear snow from parked cars on Henry Street in the Chinatown neighborhood in New York on Jan. 24, 2016. Millions of Americans began digging out Sunday from a mammoth blizzard that set a new single-day snowfall record in Washington and New York City. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan)
People clear snow from parked cars on Henry Street in the Chinatown neighborhood in New York on Jan. 24, 2016. Millions of Americans began digging out Sunday from a mammoth blizzard that set a new single-day snowfall record in Washington and New York City. (AP Photo/Peter Morgan)

Many public school students get 2nd snow day

Students in Philadelphia, Baltimore and the District of Columbia will get a second consecutive snow day as officials said schools will be closed in those cities again on Tuesday.

Officials also say government offices in the District of Columbia and Baltimore will reopen Tuesday.

People try to navigate through the snow on Park Avenue on Jan. 25, 2016 as New Yorkers return to work after the city was hit with a record-setting snowfall. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)
People try to navigate through the snow on Park Avenue on Jan. 25, 2016 as New Yorkers return to work after the city was hit with a record-setting snowfall. (Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

A man clears his car with a shovel near Central Park on Jan. 24, 2016 in New York. (FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT/AFP/Getty Images)
A man clears his car with a shovel near Central Park on Jan. 24, 2016 in New York.
(FRANCOIS XAVIER MARIT/AFP/Getty Images)

A bike is buried near Bryant Park as all cars but emergency vehicles are banned from driving on the road in New York City on Jan. 23, 2016. (Yana Paskova/Getty Images)
A bike is buried near Bryant Park as all cars but emergency vehicles are banned from driving on the road in New York City on Jan. 23, 2016. (Yana Paskova/Getty Images)

Workers remove snow on the tarmac at Ronald Reagan National Airport, with the U.S. Capitol dome seen behind, in Arlington, Va., on Jan. 24, 2016. Millions of Americans began digging out Sunday from a mammoth blizzard that set a new single-day snowfall record in Washington and New York City. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Workers remove snow on the tarmac at Ronald Reagan National Airport, with the U.S. Capitol dome seen behind, in Arlington, Va., on Jan. 24, 2016. Millions of Americans began digging out Sunday from a mammoth blizzard that set a new single-day snowfall record in Washington and New York City. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Harrisonburg residents unable to dig their cars out of their driveways and neighborhoods take to walking to their destinations as snow continues to fall in Harrisonburg, Va., on Jan. 23, 2016. (Daniel Lin/Daily News-Record via AP)
Harrisonburg residents unable to dig their cars out of their driveways and neighborhoods take to walking to their destinations as snow continues to fall in Harrisonburg, Va., on Jan. 23, 2016. (Daniel Lin/Daily News-Record via AP)

Michelle Navarre Cleary pulls a bag as she walks on K Street in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 23, 2016, as snow continues to fall. With long lead time from forecasters and stern warnings from authorities, tens of millions of residents from northern Georgia to New Jersey shuttered themselves inside to wait out a mammoth storm that made travel treacherous and could dump 2 feet or more of snow in some areas. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
Michelle Navarre Cleary pulls a bag as she walks on K Street in Washington, D.C., on Jan. 23, 2016, as snow continues to fall. With long lead time from forecasters and stern warnings from authorities, tens of millions of residents from northern Georgia to New Jersey shuttered themselves inside to wait out a mammoth storm that made travel treacherous and could dump 2 feet or more of snow in some areas. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)

Workers clear the tracks of snow at the Port Washington branch of the Long Island Railroad in Port Washington, N.Y., on Jan. 25, 2016. Service is suspended on the Port Washington branch due to the recent snowstorm. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)
Workers clear the tracks of snow at the Port Washington branch of the Long Island Railroad in Port Washington, N.Y., on Jan. 25, 2016. Service is suspended on the Port Washington branch due to the recent snowstorm. (AP Photo/Kathy Kmonicek)

Ben Osborn walks with a shovel past a line of snowed-in cars A Steet in northeast Washington on Jan. 24, 2016. Washington is digging out after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Ben Osborn walks with a shovel past a line of snowed-in cars A Steet in northeast Washington on Jan. 24, 2016. Washington is digging out after a mammoth blizzard with hurricane-force winds and record-setting snowfall brought much of the East Coast to an icy standstill. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Four Smithsonian museums will open Tuesday for the first time since they closed Friday at noon for the weekend snowstorm.

A spokeswoman says the National Museum of Natural History and the National Air and Space Museum will be open for their regular hours.

And fliers are continuing to face delays and cancelations in the aftermath of a massive weekend blizzard that slammed into the eastern U.S.

More than 2,500 flights were delayed or canceled Monday. That’s an improvement from Friday and Saturday.

Meanwhile, estimates of the storm’s economic impact are tame. Ryan Sweet and Adam Kamins, economists at Moody’s Analytics, peg the lost economic output at about $2.5 billion to $3 billion. That’s relatively small in the context of a $16 trillion economy.

The figure represents lost income for hourly workers and spending that was skipped. It does not include the cost of damage to roads or other infrastructure.

At least 37 people were killed in the storm. It dumped more than 20 inches on the East Coast — and 42 inches in one West Virginia town.