New Dog Breeds: Three New Breeds Announced by Kennel Club (Photo)

January 28, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Newly registered breeds announced, the Norwegian Lundehund, the Entlebucher Mountain dog, and the Xoloitzcuintli dog, along another beautiful breed, a Yellow Labrador Retriever. (Gary Gershoff/Getty Images)
Newly registered breeds announced, the Norwegian Lundehund, the Entlebucher Mountain dog, and the Xoloitzcuintli dog, along another beautiful breed, a Yellow Labrador Retriever. (Gary Gershoff/Getty Images)
New dog breeds were recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC), which made the announcement this week.

The Entlebucher Mountain Dog, the Norwegian Lundehund, and the Xoloitzcuintli were included in the list of breeds. There are now 170 recognized dog breeds, the Club said.

"The AKC is delighted to introduce these three distinct breeds to the public," AKC spokesperson Gina DiNardo said in a statement. "Each loveable breed has a unique and diverse history and is a wonderful addition to the AKC."

The Entlebucher Mountain Dog was originally bred to herd cattle in the Swiss Alps, is easily trained, and loyal, the AKC noted. Like other herding dogs, the Entlebucher is high-energy and needs to run around a lot.

The Lundehund has six toes on each foot and an unusually flexible spine. This enables the dog to climb rocky cliffs to hunt puffins, a flightless bird the dogs were bred to hunt. The dogs are considered loyal but sometimes are afraid of strangers if they aren’t well socialized, the organization said.

Finally, the Xoloitzcuintli, pronounced show-low-etz-queent-lee according to the AKC, is considered one of the world’s rarest breeds of dogs. The dog is sometimes hairless and is sometimes coated. It is nicknamed "The Healer," thought by indigenous people in Mexico to help people who are ill. The AKC said that the breed is “attentive and calm,” requiring some exercise and grooming.