NASA Challenges Students With Space Exploration Technology

By Joshua Philipp
Joshua Philipp
Joshua Philipp
Joshua Philipp is an award-winning investigative reporter with The Epoch Times and host of EpochTV's "Crossroads" program. He is a recognized expert on unrestricted warfare, asymmetrical hybrid warfare, subversion, and historical perspectives on today’s issues. His 10-plus years of research and investigations on the Chinese Communist Party, subversion, and related topics give him unique insight into the global threat and political landscape.
December 6, 2009 Updated: October 1, 2015

 (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)
(Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)
In time for the 10th anniversary of people living aboard the International Space Station, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is launching a few new projects to keep students dreaming of walking in space.

Living on the moon may be one of the next challenges, and NASA is offering paid internships to students who can come up with a good idea on how human life on the moon would be possible.

The 2010 NASA Moon Work engineering design contest is challenging engineering college students to design tools or instruments that would help astronauts live and work on the moon.

The winners will be offered an internship with the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program, which is working on technologies to help future NASA human exploration missions. The program is currently working on technology for the first flight of the Orion crew, as well as some long-term technologies for future lunar exploration missions.

Another, slightly less intimidating contest is being offered to 350 students from middle school to college. They will pair up into 37 teams nationwide to build a rocket that can launch a mile into the air, while having a working science payload.

According to a NASA press release, the students will create "a unique, on-board science experiment that can survive the mile-high flight and yield test results after the vehicle parachutes back to Earth."

The Student Launch Project began in the fall and will conclude on April 18, 2010.

"As a new rocket-building season gets under way, and we head toward another exhilarating launch event next April, many of these industrious young people are headed toward rewarding careers in which they'll lead new journeys of exploration and discovery—not just to Earth's lower troposphere, but to other worlds," said Tammy Rowan, manager of the Academic Affairs Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. which organizes the event, in a press release.

Joshua Philipp is an award-winning investigative reporter with The Epoch Times and host of EpochTV's "Crossroads" program. He is a recognized expert on unrestricted warfare, asymmetrical hybrid warfare, subversion, and historical perspectives on today’s issues. His 10-plus years of research and investigations on the Chinese Communist Party, subversion, and related topics give him unique insight into the global threat and political landscape.