‘Bell of Hope’ Rung for Mumbai Terrorist Attack Victims

By Joshua Philipp
Joshua Philipp
Joshua Philipp
Joshua Philipp is an award-winning investigative reporter with The Epoch Times and host of EpochTV's "Crossroads" program. He is a recognized expert on unrestricted warfare, asymmetrical hybrid warfare, subversion, and historical perspectives on today’s issues. His 10-plus years of research and investigations on the Chinese Communist Party, subversion, and related topics give him unique insight into the global threat and political landscape.
December 4, 2008 Updated: December 4, 2008
PAYING RESPECT: Dr. A.M. Gondane, the Indian deputy consul general, rings the
PAYING RESPECT: Dr. A.M. Gondane, the Indian deputy consul general, rings the

NEW YORK—The “Bell of Hope” sounded from St. Paul's Chapel in lower Manhattan on Wednesday in remembrance of the victims of the recent terrorist attacks in Mumbai, India.

Indian Deputy Consul General Dr. A.M. Gondane was joined by members of the clergy in the churchyard for a prayer for peace.

The still empty lots where the Twin Towers once stood behind the church were a reminder of the terrorist attack once felt in the city.

Gondane sounded the bell in the tradition of New York City Firefighters' “four fives” salute to fallen comrades, ringing it 20 times in four sets of five rings.

“The bell sends a message that there is a tragedy that has happened. Hopefully such a tragedy, if it can be avoided, should be avoided,” said Gondane. “The thinking [is that] people should send a message that terrorism is no way for bringing your grievances forward.”

The Lord Mayor of London, England, gave the Bell of Hope as a gift to New York City just one year after the terrorist attacks on 9-11-01.

The bell was created in the same foundry in East London where the original Liberty Bell was cast, and is now rung once a year on the anniversary of 9-11. It was also rung following the bombings in London and Madrid, as well as for the victims of the Virginia Tech shootings.

HOPE FOR PEACE: James Cooper (right), the director of the Trinity Church, St. Paul's Chapel stands beside Indian Deputy Consul General Dr. A.M. Gondane in the church courtyard.  (Joshua Philipp/The Epoch Times)
HOPE FOR PEACE: James Cooper (right), the director of the Trinity Church, St. Paul's Chapel stands beside Indian Deputy Consul General Dr. A.M. Gondane in the church courtyard. (Joshua Philipp/The Epoch Times)
“New York itself has suffered the rigors of terror. It knows the pain which is a consequence of such attacks,” said Gondane. “Therefore, New York has, in various meetings that we have attended, expressed that anguish, that pain, and they have identified their pain with our pain.”

The Mumbai terrorist attacks, which occurred last week, are still fresh in the minds of many in India. 174 people lost their lives when the terrorists, armed with rifles and grenades, raided India's commercial capital.

The terrorists went on a rampage through the city, firing randomly at pedestrians and into crowded places such as hospitals and train stations. The terrorists then took a group of hostages and held up in two luxury hotels. The conflict came to an end after Indian commandos eliminated the last of the terrorists.

“It's a very sad thing that has happened and it's very distressing that such an event could take place. We in India want to live in peace. We in India want to concentrate our efforts on tackling poverty, disease, shortages of food, and water shortages. All of our efforts and all of our energy are towards that. But somehow, in the midst of all this, an attack like this diverts our attention from the real goals and real things we want to achieve,” said Gondane.

James Cooper, the director of the Trinity Church, St. Paul's Chapel said that he and the members of his church hold compassion for the victims and their families in India.
“A bell can be tolled, which is a symbol of mourning and loss,” said Cooper. “We would do it with solidarity with those in other parts of the world who have gone through similar losses to the 9-11 loss here.”

Joshua Philipp is an award-winning investigative reporter with The Epoch Times and host of EpochTV's "Crossroads" program. He is a recognized expert on unrestricted warfare, asymmetrical hybrid warfare, subversion, and historical perspectives on today’s issues. His 10-plus years of research and investigations on the Chinese Communist Party, subversion, and related topics give him unique insight into the global threat and political landscape.