Dominion CEO to Testify in First Post-Election Appearance Before a State Legislature

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
December 15, 2020 Updated: December 15, 2020

The CEO of Dominion Voting Systems, a voting machine and software company, will answer questions from legislators in Michigan on Tuesday.

It will be the first time John Poulos has answered questions since the Nov. 3 election, which saw 28 states use Dominion products.

Poulos could face questioning about an audit released Monday that concluded Dominion’s system “is intentionally and purposefully designed with inherent errors to create systemic fraud and influence election results.”

Data firm Allied Security Operations Group examined machines and software in Antrim County this month, saying Dominion products were to blame for the infamous vote flip that occurred in the county.

According to a brief agenda from the Michigan legislature, Poulos will give a presentation during the Senate Oversight Committee hearing at the Capitol Building in Lansing at 1 p.m. You can watch a livestream here.

State Sen. Edward McBroom, a Republican, chairs the committee. A spokesman for the senator told The Epoch Times via text message that only Poulos is slated to testify.

State Rep. Matt Hall, a Republican who chairs the Michigan House Oversight Committee, originally requested Dominion send representatives to answer questions from lawmakers.

When he received no response, he threatened to subpoena Poulos, according to a letter obtained by The Epoch Times.

Epoch Times Photo
A voter puts their ballot in the tabulation machine after voting in the 2020 general election at the Northwest Activities Center in Detroit, Mich., on Nov. 3, 2020. (Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images)

Poulos then wrote to McBroom, saying a company representative could testify on “the continuing malicious and widespread disinformation campaign” against Dominion.

“I appreciate the opportunity to correct the baseless and defamatory claims being made about our systems. They are harmful not only to Dominion, but also to the countless hardworking election officials across the state, as well all Michigan public officials elected through a fair process,” Poulos said in the letter.

Dominion representatives have been sought for questioning by lawmakers in other battleground states.

The company committed to sending employees to answer questions from legislators in Pennsylvania last month but backed out, citing “threats of litigation.”

Arizona Senate Judiciary Chairman Eddie Farnsworth, a Republican, announced during an election oversight hearing on Monday that he would issue subpoenas requiring Dominion machines in Maricopa County be audited.

“There is evidence of tampering, there is evidence of fraud,” he said.

Hall said in a statement last week that he was aware of reports about software issues causing irregularities to occur.

“Representatives of the people must be able to ask officials at Dominion questions in order to provide clarity and restore faith in our elections process,” he said.

“Dominion has finally agreed to testify publicly next week. It’s about time,” added Michigan House Speaker Lee Chatfield, a Republican. “We need to get to the bottom of these accusations and hear from them.”

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.