Microsoft’s New Spartan Engine Masks Itself as Chrome

David Storey shared on Twitter how to enable the new Trident engine that Spartan and Internet Explorer will share on Windows 10
January 26, 2015 Updated: January 26, 2015

Microsoft has released the latest build of Windows 10 to Insiders packed full of surprises, some more obvious than others. Luckily, we have a community of enthusiasts that search its insides, even in the darkest corners, and also IE team leader David Storey that helped us uncover a rather interesting bit in build 9926.

He shared on Twitter how to enable the new Trident engine that Spartan and Internet Explorer will share on Windows 10, and the process is the same that worked in earlier builds. You type about:flags in the address bar and you turn set the flag to enabled for “Enable Experimental Web Platform Features”.

The interesting part is that by doing this, Internet Explorer no longer reports the normal User Agent String, which is “Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.3; Trident/7.0; rv:11.0) like Gecko”. As you can probably see in the image above, Internet Explorer now masks itself as Google Chrome, which David actually confirmed that is being done on purpose, as a workaround for a very unusual behavior. 

Many websites that you visit today will not display well in IE because they are not coded properly and usually display a page like they would in an old browser, even though Internet Explorer 11 supports many of the new web standards. Some pages will display incorrectly in IE while working perfectly fine on other browsers such as Chrome or Firefox.

Republished with permission from Neowin. Read full article