Mexico: At Least 13 Dead After Mudslides in Veracruz Caused by Fernand

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
August 26, 2013 Updated: August 26, 2013

At least 13 people died on Monday after mudslides in the Mexican state of Veracruz.

The mudslides were caused by Tropical Storm Fernand, a spokesman for the civil protection agency told AFP

Nine people died in the town of Yecuatla, three in the port city of Tuxpan and one more in the town of Atzalan, Veracruz Gov. Javier Duarte said.

A landslide of rock and mud swept onto four homes in the village of Roca de Ora, which is part of the town of Yecuatla, killing nine people in their sleep before dawn Monday.

The storm also brought heavy rains and high winds, which led to flooding and damage to more than 100 houses.

The government of Veracruz state advised its 7.7 million residents to stay home, and suspended classes in the state to protect children from venturing out into winds and rain.

The system’s maximum sustained winds Monday afternoon decreased to near 35 mph (55 kph), several hours after making landfall. Fernand was centered about 50 miles (85 kilometers) south-southwest of Tuxpan and moving northwest at about 9 mph (15 kph).

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

 

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.