Medal of Honor Video Game Should Be Banned, Says Defence Secretary

By Cassie Ryan
Cassie Ryan
Cassie Ryan
August 23, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

A first look of 'Medal Of Honor' onstage during Spike TV's 7th Annual Video Game Awards at the Nokia Event Deck at LA Live on December 12, 2009 in Los Angeles, California.  (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
A first look of 'Medal Of Honor' onstage during Spike TV's 7th Annual Video Game Awards at the Nokia Event Deck at LA Live on December 12, 2009 in Los Angeles, California. (Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
Medal Of Honor, the forthcoming video game published by Electronic Arts (EA) has received criticism from Britain’s Defence Secretary Liam Fox, the Telegraph reported. Fox called the game "un-British" after reports stated that it allows players to adopt the role of a Taliban soldier and kill British soldiers for points.

Fox urges video game retailers to refuse to sell the game.

"It's shocking that someone would think it acceptable to recreate the acts of the Taliban," Fox said in an interview with The Sunday Times, adding that he is "disgusted" by the game.

The game is set in present-day Afghanistan and its single-player combat is centred on the efforts of US troops to defeat the Taliban.

"Medal of Honor is an 18-rated highly authentic depiction of a soldier's experience in Afghanistan – matching US forces against the Taliban in today's war," an EA spokesman told the Telegraph.

EA has responded to the criticism from Fox by citing the game's authenticity and refuting the accuracy of the accusatory reports.

"For one, Medal of Honor does not allow players to kill British soldiers," the spokesman said. "British troops do not feature in the game."

Eurogamer.net–a gaming website–has reported that the Department for Culture, Media and Sport described Fox's comments as a "personal view."

Cassie Ryan