Mayor: Charlotte Considers Curfew After Protests

Gov. declares state of emergency
September 22, 2016 Updated: September 22, 2016
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CHARLOTTE, N.C.—The Latest on protests in Charlotte, North Carolina over the fatal police shooting of a black man. (all times local):

8:50 a.m.

The mayor of Charlotte says the city is considering a curfew after two nights of violence in the wake of the shooting of a black man by police.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts told ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Thursday that city officials are talking about imposing a curfew.

Streets were calm Thursday morning, but several civilians and police officers were hurt in the second night of violence Wednesday night.

CMPD officers in riot gear block the intersection near the Epicentre in Charlotte, N.C. Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016.  Authorities in Charlotte tried to quell public anger Wednesday after a police officer shot a black man, but a dusk prayer vigil turned into a second night of violence, with police firing tear gas at angry protesters and a man being critically wounded by gunfire. North Carolina's governor declared a state of emergency in the city.  (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)
CMPD officers in riot gear block the intersection near the Epicentre in Charlotte, N.C. Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. Authorities in Charlotte tried to quell public anger Wednesday after a police officer shot a black man, but a dusk prayer vigil turned into a second night of violence, with police firing tear gas at angry protesters and a man being critically wounded by gunfire. North Carolina’s governor declared a state of emergency in the city. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

City spokeswoman Ashley Simmons told local media that Roberts’ office will discuss a possible curfew with city police and the National Guard on Thursday.

The mayor said she wants people to know Charlotte is open for business Thursday. But at least three major companies told workers to avoid downtown offices.

The North Carolina National Guard arrived at a Charlotte armory early Thursday and some Guard vehicles left the armory about 8 a.m.

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7:55 a.m.

The NASCAR Hall of Fame in downtown Charlotte is among the places damaged during violent protests over the police shooting of a black man earlier this week.

The Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority oversees the NASCAR Hall of Fame building and the convention center next door. An official said the building is being assessed for damage.

Police fire teargas as protestors converge on downtown following Tuesday's police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. Protesters have rushed police in riot gear at a downtown Charlotte hotel and officers have fired tear gas to disperse the crowd. At least one person was injured in the confrontation, though it wasn't immediately clear how. Firefighters rushed in to pull the man to a waiting ambulance.(AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
Police fire teargas as protestors converge on downtown following Tuesday’s police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. Protesters have rushed police in riot gear at a downtown Charlotte hotel and officers have fired tear gas to disperse the crowd. At least one person was injured in the confrontation, though it wasn’t immediately clear how. Firefighters rushed in to pull the man to a waiting ambulance.(AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

According to local news outlets, a street sign hung off-kilter from the front window of the hall’s building after someone tried to pry it out of the window.

The regional United Way building across the street from the hall was also damaged. Lobby windows were smashed. Officials don’t know if anyone entered the building.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools are operating on a normal schedule, as is Mecklenburg County government. The regional bus line says it has restored service to all lines.

People put cargo from tractor trailers on a fire on the I-85 during protests in the early hours of Sept. 21, 2016, in Charlotte, North Carolina. The terrorist organization al-Qaeda is calling on terrorists to inspire violence by spreading hatred among blacks, white supremacists, and other groups. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
People put cargo from tractor trailers on a fire on the I-85 during protests in the early hours of Sept. 21, 2016, in Charlotte, North Carolina. The terrorist organization al-Qaeda is calling on terrorists to inspire violence by spreading hatred among blacks, white supremacists, and other groups. (Sean Rayford/Getty Images)

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7:30 a.m.

Major companies with offices in downtown Charlotte are telling their employees to stay home after two nights of violent protests following the shooting of a black man by police earlier this week.

Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Duke Energy all told employees to stay away from the area Thursday, where disturbances have damaged several business fronts.

A Duke Energy spokesman says non-essential personnel who work downtown are being told to stay home for the day.

Wells Fargo spokesman Josh Dunn said the bank’s staff is not required to report to work Thursday. Dunn said employees can work from home or another location if they’re able. Employees unable to do so won’t be required to take a personal day off.

Bank of America announced late Wednesday that its downtown staff will not report Thursday because of the damage.

The streets in downtown Charlotte appeared to be calm Thursday morning.

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2 a.m.

Downtown Charlotte is calming down early Thursday after a peaceful prayer vigil turned into a violent protest over the fatal police shooting of a black man.

Hotel and restaurant employees and security guards have started cleaning up dozens of broken windows.

But the city isn’t entirely back to normal. Bank of America told its thousands of employees at its 60-story downtown skyscraper to stay home Thursday.

One man was critically injured in Wednesday’s protest. City officials say police did not fire on the victim. Several reporters and people on the street were attacked as police in riot gear linked arms, marched down streets and fired tear gas.

Four police officers were injured during the protests.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory declared a state of emergency and promised to bring in the National Guard.