Mark Zuckerberg Facebook Page Apparently Hacked, Taken Down

January 26, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook headquarters on October 6, in Palo Alto, California. Zuckerberg had his own facebook page hacked into on Wednesday. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook headquarters on October 6, in Palo Alto, California. Zuckerberg had his own facebook page hacked into on Wednesday. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, had to change web addresses for his Facebook fan page on Tuesday after a hacker apparently gained access to the account.

A message on his page said that the popular social networking site had adopted a new business model.

The message read: "Let the hacking begin: If facebook needs money, instead of going to the banks, why doesn't Facebook let its users invest in Facebook in a social way? Why not transform Facebook into a 'social business' the way Nobel Prize winner Muhammad Yunus described it? http://bit.ly/fs6rT3 What do you think? #hackercup2011."

Before the message was taken down, more than 1,800 people hit the like button on the post and a number of the comments were peppered with obscenities.

Since then, Zuckerberg's page was also taken down, about which the Facebook company made no comment.

On Wednesday, the company posted a blog entry that draws attention to Data Privacy Day, which takes place this Friday.

"We've developed a number of complex systems that operate behind the scenes to keep you secure on Facebook," the post read.

Graham Cluley, a senior technology consultant at Sophos, wrote that the hacking gives a black eye to the website that touts increased security and privacy.

"Mark Zuckerberg might be wanting to take a close look at his privacy and security settings after this embarrassing breach, and consider who is allowed to post on his behalf," he wrote on Wednesday.

"It's not clear if he was careless with his password, was phished, or sat down in a Starbucks and got sidejacked while using an unencrypted wireless network, but however it happened, it's left egg on his face just when Facebook wants to reassure users that it takes security and privacy seriously," Cluley added.