Louisiana Sinkhole Sucks Up Trees: Raw Video

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
August 21, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

The Assumption Parish, Louisiana sinkhole sucked up a clump of trees on Wednesday evening, and it was caught on video.

The video, taken by a parish official, shows the trees quickly swallowed by the sinkhole.

The edge collapse, or “slough-in,” happened at about 5:30 p.m., parish officials told The Advocate

The collapse came after the hole’s periodic increases in underground tremors, also known as burps. After the burps the monitoring alert status was increased to Code 3, which restricts all work inside the containment berm.

The sinkhole has been growing since it emerged sometime late August 2 or early August 3 last year, and continued growth is expected for some time, perhaps years.

The sinkhole is believed to be caused by a failed cavern wall in the western-edge caverns under the Napoleonville Salt Dome owned by Texas Brine. The collapse triggered a chain-reaction of collapses that hasn’t stopped.

The hole is now about 25 acres in size. It has forced numerous residents to move out of the area. 

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.