Hurricane Rosa, Tropical Storm Kirk Form: Latest Updates

Top video: NASA captures Hurricane Florence from space
September 26, 2018 Updated: September 26, 2018

U.S. weather officials are issuing advisories and warnings for Hurricane Rosa and Tropical Storm Kirk.

Hurricane Rosa

Hurricane Rosa formed on Sept. 26 in the eastern Pacific Ocean and is about 500 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC). It is also located 480 miles southwest of the Baja California peninsula in Mexico.

The storm has winds of 75 mph and is moving at 10 mph west-northwest, the agency said. “This general motion is forecast to continue for the next two days. A turn to the northwest is expected by Saturday morning,” it continued.

Hurricane rosa near mexico
Hurricane Rosa formed on Sept. 26, 2018, in the eastern Pacific Ocean and is about 500 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. (NHC)

“Swells generated by Rosa will affect portions of the coast of southwestern Mexico and the southern Baja California Peninsula late this week and over the weekend. These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip current conditions. Please consult products from your local weather office,” according to the NHC.

There are no coastal warnings or watches for the storm, which is the 10th hurricane of the eastern Pacific 2018 season.

NOAA image of hurricane rosa
A NOAA satellite photo shows Hurricane Rosa in the Pacific. (NOAA)

Tropical Storm Kirk

Tropical Storm Kirk re-formed and is “a little stronger” with 50 mph winds, moving at 18 mph to the west to the Caribbean Sea.

Tropical storm warnings are in effect for Barbados, St. Lucia, Dominica, Martinique, and Guadeloupe. A tropical storm watch is in effect for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Tropical storm kirk and hurricane rosa formed
U.S. weather officials are issuing advisories and warnings for Hurricane Rosa and Tropical Storm Kirk. (NHC)

“A westward to west-northwestward motion is expected over the next few days. On the forecast track, the center will move over the Lesser Antilles within the Tropical Storm Warning area Thursday night,” said the NHC at 11 a.m. on Sept. 26.

“Little change in strength is forecast until Kirk crosses the Lesser Antilles, followed by weakening over the eastern Caribbean Sea,” it added.

Disturbance Near Carolinas

The NHC also noted a “weak low-pressure area located about 100 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina,” which is producing “disorganized shower activity.” The storm is likely going to be weakened by “strong upper-level winds” and will likely not develop to a tropical depression or storm.

“The low is forecast to move northeastward this morning, and it could produce scattered showers and dangerous surf and rip currents across eastern North Carolina as it passes by. The low is expected to continue moving northeastward and merge with a frontal system or dissipate offshore of the New England coast on Thursday,” the NHC said.

Leslie

Leslie, now a post-tropical cyclone, is several hundred miles west-southwest of the Portuguese Azores.

“Leslie is expected to reacquire subtropical or tropical characteristics on Thursday or Friday while the cyclone meanders over the north-central Atlantic,” the agency also said.

No warnings were issued for the storm.