HR 2, ‘Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law’ Passes in Congress

January 20, 2011 Updated: October 1, 2015

Michele Bachmann (R-MN) speaks at a news conference where Republican members of the House demand the repeal of health care legislation January 18, in Washington, DC. The House voted 245-189 for HR 2, Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law.  (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Michele Bachmann (R-MN) speaks at a news conference where Republican members of the House demand the repeal of health care legislation January 18, in Washington, DC. The House voted 245-189 for HR 2, Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)
The House of Representatives tried to convey the new spirit of civility on January 19, as it voted to repeal the 2009 health care reform bill. The House voted 245-189 for HR 2, Repealing the Job-Killing Health Care Law.

Representative Debbie Wasserman-Schultz, Democrat of Florida, evoked the tragedy in Tucson. She cited Pat Maisch as a person who supported Health Care reform. Maisch was one of those who stopped the Tucson gunman from reloading after he shot Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords and others on Jan. 8. “Pat actually knocked the second gun clip from the gunman’s hand,” she said.

She said Maisch went to Gifford’s meeting to say that as a small business owner, health care reform made it easier for her to offer health insurance to her employees, not harder. “Heed the words of Pat Maisch, heed the words of millions needing health care,” said Wasserman-Schultz during the floor debate.

Other Democrats spoke of taxpayers having to pay for the uninsured before health care reform, while Republicans called health care reform a government takeover, mind numbing bureaucracy, Obamacare, and a job killer.

The Chamber of Commerce ran an ad which said “The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (H.R. 3590) is fatally flawed and an irresponsible bill that America’s businesses and working families can’t afford to pay.”

House Speaker Robert Boehner said Republicans would proceed with the vote to repeal in order to keep a promise to their constituents.

Many of those elected in 2010 had campaigned against the health care reform bill.

Congressman Dennis Kucinich of Ohio said “This debate is the wrong debate. A for-profit model is the wrong model. We should be talking about universal health care, single-payer not-for-profit health care, Medicare for All, quality health care for all Americans.”