Harvey’s Rains Turn Texas Highway, I-10, Into an Ocean

August 30, 2017 Updated: August 30, 2017    

Before-and-after shots in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey show waves rolling across what was formerly a highway in Texas.

Photos and video show Texas highway Interstate 10, between Houston and Beaumont, completely submerged in water. Ocean-like waves can be seen underneath a highway sign.

“It’s scary to know there were still cows out there and alive,” photographer Logal Wheat said, “but it puts a knot in my throat to know we couldn’t get them out,” according to MailOnline.

“The boat was being thrown around a lot,” he told CNN, adding that the waves were between “three to four feet” high.

Wheat and owners of Phillips Ranch in Winnie, Texas, tried to move cattle to higher ground amid the historic flooding.

“They were in chest deep water,” he said, adding, “We only found a small group of them.”

Houston Police block Interstate 10 East early Monday morning near the junction with Loop 610 due to high water from Hurricane Harvey August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
Houston Police block Interstate 10 East early Monday morning near the junction with Loop 610 due to high water from Hurricane Harvey August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

Out of 90 cattle, they managed to find only about 30.

Houston’s infrastructure took a beating as of tens of thousands of people fled submerged homes and flooded roads on Wednesday, while some incidents of looting and armed robberies forced a midnight curfew, Reuters reported.

Volunteer search and rescuers from Passion Pursuit film production company launch their motor boat near Bray Bayou and Loop 610 to rescue flood victims in the Meyerland neighborhood  after Hurricane Harvey inundated the area Aug. 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
Volunteer search and rescuers from Passion Pursuit film production company launch their motor boat near Bray Bayou and Loop 610 to rescue flood victims in the Meyerland neighborhood after Hurricane Harvey inundated the area Aug. 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)

City officials prepared to vote to allocate $20 million to storm relief, said city Controller Chris Brown. “Houston will have enough money to handle this storm,” he vowed.

The surge in evacuees has been stressing resources in the nations’s fourth-largest city. More than 3,000 Houston homes were underwater and thousands more were threatened by two reservoirs swollen by as much as 52 inches (132 cm) of rain in some areas.

Reuters contributed to this report.