Gun Manufacturer Offers Relatives of Sandy Hook Victims $33 Million Settlement

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
July 28, 2021 Updated: July 28, 2021

A gun manufacturer hit with a lawsuit over the 2012 massacre at an elementary school in Connecticut is offering plaintiffs a $33 million settlement.

The settlement was offered in court papers filed Tuesday by lawyers representing Remington Arms Company and Remington Outdoor Company.

Remington made “an Offer of Compromise” for the sum of $3.66 million to each of the plaintiffs, who are relatives of people killed in the massacre.

Josh Koskoff, the attorney representing the families, told The Epoch Times in an emailed statement that “the families will consider their next steps.”

Remington did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Adam Lanza opened fire at Sandy Hook Elementary School in 2012, murdering 26 people, including 20 children.

The families of nine of the kids who lost their lives sued Remington two years later, alleging the manufacturer’s employees knew that selling AR-15s to civilians meant “individuals unfit to operate these weapons gain access to them” and that the gun’s firepower “enables an individual in possession of the weapon to inflict unparalleled civilian carnage.”

Remington responded in court documents that they were immune from the claims due to the protection of the Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, and that plaintiffs lacked standing to pursue claims against them for alleged violations of a state law—the Connecticut Unfair Trade Practices Act.

Those arguments were rejected by Superior Court Judge Barbara Bellis.

If the offer is not accepted, Remington faces the prospect of a trial.

Remington filed for bankruptcy last year and multiple companies later purchased some of its assets.

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.