GOP Candidate Sues Washington State Secretary, Demands Audit Over Alleged Fraud

December 11, 2020 Updated: December 11, 2020

The GOP gubernatorial candidate for Washington state, Loren Culp, filed a lawsuit against Washington Secretary of State Kim Wyman and asked for injunctive relief while demanding an audit of paper ballots cast on Nov. 3.

The lawsuit also seeks an audit of voting results in King, Clark, Thurston, Pierce, Kitsap, and Skagit counties—as well as vote-counting machines, according to MyNorthWest.

“We’re not conceding anything. We’re fighting until we have no options—and then, we’ll fight some more,” his campaign said in a Facebook statement Thursday.

Culp campaign adviser Christopher Gergen and Culp’s attorney, Dr. Stephen Pidgeon, said in a YouTube video that the lawsuit was filed.

“We saw a lot of problems here in this particular election. And our review of this election is starting to surface things that are just, quite frankly, unacceptable,” Pidgeon said. “If you get overconfident, you tend to get sloppy, and that’s exactly what happened,” he added.

Pidgeon added that Washington’s state Constitution calls on the secretary of state to make sure the election is fairly run.

“We know that the state did not run the failed ID act software against their own database prior to the election, so people were getting duplicate ballots, lots of them,” he said. “They had 336,000 names on their mailing list that were people who had moved, many of which were undeliverable, but 171,000 of which had moved out of state,” he added.

“The one that really tops it off, is of course the voting dead, which we see clear evidence of this,” Pidgeon remarked. “They put out ballots to over 10,000 dead people, and 7,800 of them voted.”

Wyman, a Republican, told KTTH that Culp’s campaign has not provided evidence.

“That’s what’s been a little frustrating by all these allegations on social media over the past month — give me something tangible,” she said on Dec. 4. “Give me a name of a person with an affidavit that’s signed and said that they received a ballot that shouldn’t have. Give me a name of a person that’s deceased who had a ballot returned.”

And in a letter last week, Wyman called on Culp to back up his assertions.

“If Mr. Culp, his attorney, or anyone else believes they have evidence of fraud, I urge them to report their findings to their county election officials and the Secretary of State’s Office,” Wyman’s office said in a statement. “As a member of law enforcement who purports to have evidence of felonies, Mr. Culp should be duty-bound to provide that evidence to the appropriate authorities so these cases can be investigated by county sheriffs and prosecutors, and possibly the FBI.”