Google Will Launch Google TV This Fall

May 20, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

Google, is set to launch a new TV operating system called Google TV, by fusing their Android operating system and Chrome Web browser.  (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Google, is set to launch a new TV operating system called Google TV, by fusing their Android operating system and Chrome Web browser. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
Search engine giant, Google, is set to launch a new TV operating system by fusing their Android operating system and Chrome Web browser. The new line-up is meant to replace the usual TV cable/satellite tuner setup box with one that can be used to browse channels on your TV as well as browse the Internet from one system.

Imagine being able to search your favorite Youtube videos or TV programs while relaxing on your couch by vocally ordering the TV set to play the desired programs. Such a scenario will be possible this fall, thanks to Google TV.

Users will be able to use their Android devices and smartphones as remote controls by peering the phone with the TV. It will also be possible to link or peer more than one Android smartphone with the same TV.

Viewers will be able to minimize the program they are watching into the corner of the screen while using the rest of the TV screen to browse for other programs or view Web pages.

Google TV is slated to include the Adobe Flash Player application, allowing web pages with rich Internet Flash applications to run on the television. Google has thrown its weight behind Adobe's Flash format, and its support is being tagged as a key differentiator with Apple's iPad and iPhone devices, which will not be supporting Flash technology.

Even though the price for the system has not been announced yet, the Google TV enabled television sets will be available in Best Buy stores upon launch. Sony's retailers will be the first to offer TV’s that will integrate Google TV.

Already own a HDTV? There should be no trouble in using Logitech’s “companion box” that will allow a user to connect to Google TV using the pervasive HDMI cable.

While analysts are watching the launch of Google TV closely, critics say that the price of Google TV is too high to be meaningful. Electronics manufacturer Panasonic earlier this year said that it would not integrate Google TV with its systems as the cost of the hardware was too high.

In contrast, California-based Roku provides a system which includes television, Web and video library videos and support for NetFlix video; the system sells for roughly $100.