Google Introduces Onebox Music Search

October 29, 2009 Updated: October 1, 2015

A screenshot of Google's Onebox feature, showing results for a search for a popular music song. Google announced that it was adding music features to OneBox. (Epoch Times Staff)
A screenshot of Google's Onebox feature, showing results for a search for a popular music song. Google announced that it was adding music features to OneBox. (Epoch Times Staff)
Taking yet another step into the area of content searches, Google announced the launch of a new kind of music search that uses its Onebox search feature which provides contextual information for user searches on the Google search page.

Now, when a users enters a music related query on the Google homepage, he or she will be able to stream songs directly from Google’s search results page. At the same time, Google will serve the user with additional information such as links to video clips as well as other songs from the same singer or performer.

Google's Music Onebox will be available in the U.S only and is being gradually being rolled out.

Onebox relies on two music services, Lala and iLike (iLike was recently acquired by MySpace) to provide a content.

Lala is a popular music website with a database of 7 million songs. Lala users can buy streaming versions of songs for 10 cents a piece. The music site iLike is a destination for sharing music recommendations and playlists, while its music application is wide-spread on social sites like Facebook or Bebo.

Gracenote, another partner for Google's Music Onebox, helps identify songs using searches related to lyrics in the song.

The new music search feature should also help with music discovery by linking to sites such as Pandora, imeem or Rhapsody.

Google Music Onebox provides functionality that its largest Internet rival, Yahoo, has been offering for some time now. But the real target of Google's product could be iTunes, Apple's online store for buying music. Currently, music from Google's Onebox music service can be purchased through MySpace or Lala, but industry analysts predict that in the future, Google might offer its own store.