Global Q&A: ‘What would you like to say to the people in Japan?’

April 14, 2011 Updated: April 20, 2011

Encouragement that they have the strength to rebuild their lives, along with suggestions to reduce the reliance on nuclear power are the tenor of most messages people from Pakistan to Romania want to share with Japan. This is what Epoch Times reporters found when they asked locals: “What would you like to say to the people in Japan?”

Saqib Majee, Bangalore, Pakistan.
Saqib Majee, Bangalore, Pakistan.
Bangalore, Pakistan
Saqib Majee, 38, Business Owner

As history witnessed, the Japanese rebuilt their economy and industry after World War II, I am sure they will repeat their capacity again for managing the recent disastrous situation. You are a nation of excellence, and I would like to suggest you not rely on nuclear energy, as many countries are strongly opposing this form of energy. Nuclear energy mishaps not only concern the respective country, it concerns and worries the whole world community. I would like to say, you should rebuild in accordance with the basic nature principles and not depend upon nuclear energy.

Margaret Brinck, Ydrefors, Sweden.
Margaret Brinck, Ydrefors, Sweden.
Ydrefors, Sweden
Margaret Brinck, 56, Nurse

I had a moment of silence for them after the first earthquake via the FaceBook page. I think that they would need an option other than nuclear power as an energy source; for it will perhaps happen that there will be more earthquakes in the future.

Rasto Turan, Pezinok, Slovakia.
Rasto Turan, Pezinok, Slovakia.
Pezinok, Slovakia
Rasto Turan, 33, Security Service

I would like to say that I admire them. I like their solidarity, ability to help each other, and renew the devastated country.

Sonia Williams, Freeport, Bahamas, (Visiting New York).
Sonia Williams, Freeport, Bahamas, (Visiting New York).
Freeport, Bahamas, (Visiting New York)
Sonia Williams, 42, Office Manager

Trust in God and everything will be all right. It’s hard, but just believe that there is a great God who can make everything better. It’s hard where they are; it’s devastating what they have gone through, but once you’re alive, be thankful that you are alive.

Guisella Gomez, Lima, Peru.
Guisella Gomez, Lima, Peru.
Lima, Peru
Guisella Gómez, 39, Independent Worker

I would tell them: Be strong! The most difficult moment has past; everything will get better, and move on. Pray a lot; believe in God. And to the parents who care for their children, I would say to them, ‘There is no misfortune that doesn’t bring some good with it.’

Manuel Bautista Garcia, Santa Brigida, (Canary Islands), Spain.
Manuel Bautista Garcia, Santa Brigida, (Canary Islands), Spain.
Santa Brigida, (Canary Islands), Spain
Manuel Bautista García, 53, Offset Printing Specialist

Speaking from the heart, there are no words to say to these people who have lost their families; that is the most painful and sad. … Seeing the children on the street, not knowing why the day before they had a home and a happy life and now suddenly … all is gone. So I really don’t have the right words to say to them, but disasters like this should make the people of the world think about what do we want? So much harm to the environment, so many nuclear, and chemical weapons, why?

Alexandra Apopei, Falticeni, Romania.
Alexandra Apopei, Falticeni, Romania.
Falticeni, Romania
Alexandra Apopei, 17, High-School Student

I sincerely think that you, Japanese people, are strong and brave and you will manage to face the problem you are going through. This is God’s way to test you and the only way to pass this test is to be united, help each other and have faith that everything will be better. Also, remember that the whole world is impressed by your situation and everybody wants to help. Together we can put this behind us and create a brighter future!

Jorge Ricardo Reyes, Colombia.
Jorge Ricardo Reyes, Colombia.
Colombia
Jorge Ricardo Reyes, 39, Bio-Energetics

It is possible that currently humanity has this kind of suffering; it is enjoying a technology at the expense of the earth’s exploitation, but it is not aware of the damage that it’s causing, or to her harmony. We have to change all that, technology should be used moderately not excessively so as not to disconnect ourselves and become more self-centered as it is happening now. Very sectarian, I think we need to change that.

Look for the Global Q&A column every week. Epoch Times correspondents interview people around the world to learn about their lives and perspectives on local and global realities. Next week’s global question: “Do you think there is hope for the environment?”