Giuliani: Trump Campaign May Have Sufficient Evidence to Change Pennsylvania Election Results

November 9, 2020 Updated: November 9, 2020

Rudy Giuliani, one of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyers, said on Nov. 8 that the Trump campaign may have sufficient evidence to change the election results in the state of Pennsylvania.

In an interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo on Sunday, Giuliani said that lawsuits being filed by Trump’s reelection campaign might show that as many as 900,000 invalid ballots were cast in the battleground state.

According to an unofficial vote count from the Pennsylvania Department of State, Biden has received 3.35 million votes to Trump’s 3.31 million votes. Percentage-wise, Biden has 49.7 percent, compared to Trump’s 49.1 percent.

“I think we have enough to change Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania election was a disaster,” Giuliani said, responding to a question from the host about whether the evidence is enough to change the fate of the presidential election.

“We have people that observed people being pushed out of the polling place. We have people who were suggested to vote the other way and shown how to do it. I’m giving you the big picture,” he said, noting that new lawsuits may emerge as soon as Nov. 9.

Epoch Times Photo
An alleged poll watcher speaks as attorney for the president Rudy Giuliani (C) listens at a news conference in the parking lot of a landscaping company in Philadelphia on Nov. 7, 2020. (Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images)

While mail-in ballots were being counted, GOP Pittsburgh observers were “kept out of the room or kept away from the room” for a period of 24 hours, Giuliani alleged.

“Even though we went to court and we were allowed to move six feet closer, the Democrat machine people moved the counting place six feet further away. This is documented on videotape. There are upwards of 50 witnesses,” he continued.

Reports of ballot back-dating are also being looked into by the Trump team, he added.

“We have evidence now—from not only the Post Office, but from others—that there was back-dating. I can only tell you right now that that amounts to about 2,000 or 3,000 votes,” Giuliani said.

Several major election fraud accusations have been made in the Keystone State. A U.S. Postal Service worker said he overheard superiors discussing backdating ballots. Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) said he’s calling on the Department of Justice to look into that allegation.

Automatic Recount

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) said Sunday that the vote margin between the two candidates in the state is close to the threshold that would trigger an automatic recount.

“You know, 70 million Americans voted for Donald Trump and they and the president deserve to have this process play out. Now, I understand yesterday, the media projected how this is going to end, and the media projection is probably correct, but there is a reason that we actually do the count,” Toomey said during a virtual appearance on CBS News’ “Face the Nation.”

“And by the way, part of our process is to adjudicate disputes. It can include recounts. In fact, under Pennsylvania law, there’s an automatic recount if the vote margin is half a percent. At the moment Joe Biden is leading in Pennsylvania by only six-tenths of one percent. So, let’s let this come to its proper conclusion and, in the process, maximize the number of people who have confidence it was done properly.”

Pennsylvania law states that unless waived by all of the affected candidates, the secretary of state must order all county boards of election to conduct a recount if, based on unofficial returns, a candidate for public office was defeated by 0.5 percent or less of the votes cast. He also said that either candidate can trigger a recount outside of the 0.5 percent for a fee.

While a number of news organizations have called the presidential race for Biden, The Epoch Times won’t declare a winner until all results are certified and any legal challenges are resolved. State legislatures and the Electoral College are the bodies that certify presidential elections.

Zachary Stieber contributed to this report.