Giant Pink Slugs in Australia National Park

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
May 30, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

Giant pink slugs: The slugs, which are up to 20 centimeters long, eat other creatures.

”It’s a tiny island of alpine forest, hundreds of kilometres away from anything else like it,” Michael Murphy, a national park ranger, said, referring to the top of Mount Kaputar. The slugs, for example, are buried in the leaf mould during the day, but sometimes at night they come out in their hundreds and feed off the mould and moss on the trees. They are amazing, unreal-looking creatures.”

Locals have known about the slugs for a while, but taxonomists recently confirmed the slugs are unique to the mountain, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.

The pink slug can be seen after rain on rocks, trees and amongst the leaf litter, according to the website for the park. Mount Kaputar National Park is about one hours drive from Narrabri in New South Wales. 

 

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.