Expert Calls for Dublin’s Creative Industry to be Promoted

May 27, 2010 Updated: May 27, 2010

The creative industries in the Greater Dublin Region employ 77,000 people and is worth 3.2 billion euro according to a recent study which was initiated by Dublin’s lord Mayor Emer Costello.The creative industries in the Greater Dublin Region employ 77,000 people and is worth 3.2 billion euro according to a recent study which was initiated by Dublin’s lord Mayor Emer Costello.

The study which was undertaken by leading academics in Maynooth College is the first that provides an estimate of the economic value of the creative industries such as advertising, publishing, research and development in the Greater Dublin Region.

Peter Finnegan of International Relations, Research and Special Projects told The Epoch Times that following on from this report what needs to be done is to promote the factors that lead to creativity and remove those that stifle it.

“We want to promote creativity at base level not just at business level because business usually comes about as a result of creativity", said Mr Finnegan.

Citing the achievements realised from the digital animation industry Mr Finnegan said, “When you think that industry originated from Ballyfermot Senior College when a creative initiative was taken to utilise the talent of local graffiti artists.”

Peter Finnegan said that when a creative becomes a successful realty there is usually a knock on effect in the chain of jobs created in behind the scenes production, advertising and export.

The creative industries are high on the agenda of policy makers in recent years as a core sector stimulating growth and employment in the emerging knowledge economy. Lord Mayor Costello said, “We have to recognise and harness the talents of the unemployed, so that creativity can find expression, creativity helps to create jobs so we must be creative as policy makers and service providers.”

Communications Officer for RTE told The Epoch Times that the demand for home grown programmes has always been high from the Irish public and is continuing on an upward trend. “We now encourage amateur film makers to get involved in the media industry through our online competition site ‘Story Land’ where budding writers and film makers can submit their work. Submissions are viewed on the web and voted on by the public, the winning entry is then televised,” said the RTE representative.

He added, "RTE produced 4,600 hours of home produced programmes last year and many have sold abroad including The Clinic, Proof, Fluffy Gardens (a children’s programme) and The Lyrics Board which was a huge success abroad. In fact 53% of our revenue was generated through commercial enterprise.”

A city initiative by Dublin Local Authorities that involves working with businesses in the city to find innovative solutions to common city challenges such as water and traffic management was an example given by the Lord Mayor of how local government itself was being creative. Part of ‘Think Dublin’ research series of Dublin City Councils International Relations and Research Department the findings of ‘Defining and Valuing Dublin’s Creative industries’ will inform the policy debate on how best to develop this sector. The study is being presented to an international conference on creativity and innovation which is being held in Dublin.