Electors Say They’ve Received Death Threats Telling Them to Vote for Clinton

November 28, 2016 9:42 am Last Updated: November 28, 2016 10:14 am

Electors in Michigan have said they’ve faced death threats to vote for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump, who won the state.

Michigan elector Michael Banerian said he’s received “aggressive” emails, including one threatening to shoot him in the head, according to the Detroit News.

Electors in the state will be casting their vote on Dec. 19 in Lansing for Trump, making his presidential election official. The electors were chosen at the Michigan Republican Party State Convention on August 27.

“You have people saying, ‘You’re a hateful bigot, I hope you die,'” Banerian told the Detroit News. “I’ve had people talk about shoving a gun in my mouth and blowing my brains out. And I’ve received dozens and dozens of those emails. Even the non-threatening-my-life emails are very aggressive.”

“I mean, I’d prefer not getting inundated with angry Facebook messages and emails from anti-Trump individuals and the occasional death threat isn’t fun,” said Banerian. “Honestly though, it doesn’t bother me too much, glad to participate in such an important part of the process.”

Michigan won the state’s 16 electoral votes by 10,704, according to the state’s count on Friday when it declared Trump the winner.

“Even if I could, I wouldn’t be remotely interested in changing my vote The people of Michigan spoke, and it’s our job to deliver that message,” Banerian added.

Texas Republican Alex Kim said he and other electors have also received threats in the form of emails and phone calls.

“At first, everyone was kind of enchanted by it,” Kim told NBC5 in Dallas-Fort Worth. “Now all the electors are starting to get beaten down. There are some electors who have been threatened with harm or with death.”

Last week, Idaho Secretary of State Lawerence Denney sent out a statement urging people to stop harassing the state’s electors.

“While there is no federal requirement binding electors to their pledge, and while Idaho is one of 21 states that does not have state-level legislation to force an elector to comply, attempting to sway an elector’s commitment to their party through insults, vulgar language, or threats simply lacks civility,” Denney said.

“These are people who have volunteered to represent our state and their party in a process that goes back to the founding of our nation,” he stated. “If the presidential election had been different, the presidential electors would be from a different party and would still deserve the same respect. They don’t deserve to be mistreated by someone just because that person doesn’t agree with the outcome of the election.”

After Friday’s official Michigan win, Trump has 306 electoral votes while Clinton has 232. According to the Cook Political Report, Clinton won the popular vote by more than 2.2 million votes—although Trump defeated Clinton by nearly 1 million votes in the 13 U.S. swing states.

Former Green Party candidate Jill Stein last week said she would challenge the results in Wisconsin after raising millions of dollars via online fundraising in a matter of days. Clinton’s team said over the weekend that they would join in the recounting effort—which Trump derided in a statement and on social media.