El Paso County: Flash Flood Warning for Colorado Springs, Surrounding Area

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
August 22, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

A flash flood warning has been issued for southern El Paso County until 1:oo a.m. MDT on Friday, around where the Black Forest burn scar is.

The warning includes Colorado Springs, Midway, Ellicott, Fountain, Manitou Springs, and Peterson and Schriever Air Force Bases. 

2 to 6 inches of rain has already fallen across much of southern El Paso County, and up to 1 inch of additional rain could fall through 11:30 p.m.

 

“Media reports indicate widespread flash flooding across southern El Paso County,” the service said. “Additional rain will only exacerbate the situation.”

The flooding will likely impact the Black Forest burn scar “in a very big way,” says the National Weather Service, which issued the warning.

“Serious flash flooding is likely, including road washouts and possible bridge washouts. Move to high ground at once.”

About 2,200 people in the Colorado Springs metro area are without power, likely because of tonight’s storms, reported KRDC.

Sirens are sounding across Manitou Springs due to approaching flood waters.

Just a small amount of rain on a burn scar can lead to flash flooding because water that is normally absorbed by soil and vegetation runs off almost instantly.

The doppler radar indicates thunderstorms moving across the warned area, and two to three inches has already fallen in some parts of it.

“This is a very excessive amount of rainfall and very likely to cause serious flash flooding over northwestern El Paso County,” reports the service.

It’s deeming it a “very dangerous” and “life-threatening situation.”

Manitou Springs, a town hit hard by flooding less than three weeks ago, is especially threatened. 

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.