Dutch Plane Crash Survivor Brings Attention to Alleged Sole Survivor Vesna Vulovic

May 13, 2010 Updated: October 1, 2015

An eight-year-old Dutch boy was the sole survivor when a Libyan Afriqiyah Airways plane arriving from South Africa exploded on landing at the Libyan capital's airport, killing more than 100 people. (Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images)
An eight-year-old Dutch boy was the sole survivor when a Libyan Afriqiyah Airways plane arriving from South Africa exploded on landing at the Libyan capital's airport, killing more than 100 people. (Mahmud Turkia/AFP/Getty Images)
The Dutch boy who survived the recent Libyan plane crash that killed 103 people has brought attention to other sole survivors from tragic plane crashes. The most remarkable survivor was Vesna Vulovic who allegedly survived a midair bombing that led to the plane she was traveling on to fall from 33,000 feet in the air.

Prague-based investigative journalists Peter Hornung and Pavel Theiner cast doubts on her account. They researched the incident, concluding that the Czech air force accidentally shot her plane down at a much lower altitude. Vulovic, who was badly hurt, remembered nothing of the events.

A Libyan plane flying from South Africa crashed in Libya, killing everyone on board except for a ten-year-old Dutch boy who has been identified as Ruben van Assouw. Reuben was found a half a mile from the wreckage of the tail of the plane, with bruises and broken bones. Every other passenger died, perhaps including his parents, reported the Associated Press.

The occurrence of 104 people falling from the sky is a tragic event. The part that is hard to believe is that only one person lived, leaving some to view it as a miracle and some a coincidence.

President of the European Parliament Jerzy Buzek said the boy’s survival was a "miracle."

Assouw’s experience brought up past cases of people who survived plane crashes involving the death of every passenger except one sole survivor like Vesna Vulovic.

Vulovic holds the record in the Guinness Book of World Records for surviving a plane crashing from the highest altitude. She is now attracting attention from people around the world who are intrigued with the idea of "sole survivors." Vulovic was working as a flight attendant when the plane she was on went down due to an alleged explosion. The explosion resulted from a bomb brought on board by a terrorist on the flight, reported www.LalateNews.com.

Secret documents from the Czech civil aviation authority led Hornung to conclude that story was communist propaganda, reported the Guardian. Hornung told the Guardian, "The Czechoslovak secret police managed to spread this wild tale throughout the world."

No one can prove whether its fate, luck, or coincidence that leads to these rare survival stories but psychiatrist Carl Jung had his own theory on the study of coincidence.

Jung who pioneered the idea of introverted personality types versus extroverted personality types also coined the term synchronicity. Synchronicity involves what Jung called “universal forces” that bring together coincidental or unexplained reoccurring experiences in a person’s life.

Synchronicity can also be described as the “Acausal Connecting Principle” factor that explains repeating situations that defy the idea of causation or standard reoccurrence based on mathematical prediction.