Dr. Robert Malone: COVID-19 ‘No Longer a Global Health Crisis’

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. and world news. He is based in Maryland.
and Steve Lance
Steve Lance
Steve Lance
Steve Lance is the host of Capitol Report, a political news show based in Washington aimed at providing a direct channel to the voices and people who shape policy in America. Capitol Report features all of the political news of the day with expert interviews and analysis.
May 13, 2022 Updated: May 13, 2022

The COVID-19 pandemic is over, according to Dr. Robert Malone.

“We’re through the acute phase,” Malone, a scientist who helped invent the messenger RNA technology, said on NTD’s “Capitol Report.” “This is no longer a global health crisis or even a national health crisis.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and President Joe Biden’s chief medical adviser, said in April that “we are certainly right now in this country out of the pandemic phase,” noting how COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths have plunged since hitting highs in January.

Fauci, who also emphasized that he believes the pandemic was still ongoing globally, soon walked back his comments, telling news outlets that the United States is still in the pandemic phase but is on its way to an endemic one.

Malone, though, believes Fauci’s original comments were accurate.

“It was fascinating that Dr. Fauci acknowledged that we’re through this acute phase and then walked it back the following day. I could speculate about the politics. Dr. Fauci doesn’t brief me on a regular basis. But it’s our opinion that we’re through that,” Malone said, referring to colleagues with the Global COVID Summit and the International Alliance of Physicians and Medical Scientists.

The caveat, according to the doctor, is a potentially more pathogenic version of the CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus, which causes COVID-19, in the months ahead.

Malone and some other scientists say the COVID-19 vaccines, because they don’t protect well against infection, can actually lead to virus strains that cause more severe disease than earlier variants.

“And so we’re all cautious, cautiously hopeful,” Malone said.

Malone commented as the United States recorded upticks in COVID-19 cases—hitting 146,374 cases on May 11, up from tens of thousands per day in March—and hospitalizations—with hospital admissions with confirmed COVID-19 increasing 17 percent in the week ending May 11 from the week prior.

The Biden administration has warned of a potential wave in the fall and urged people to get a vaccine or booster shots if they have not, at the same time as officials eye authorizing strain-specific shots. But Malone said that based on his research, the reason surges of viruses happen at certain times in the year stem from vitamin D deficiencies.

There’s “virtually no deaths attributable to COVID in people who have adequate levels of vitamin D,” Malone said.

“If the White House was really concerned about mitigating the risks for coronavirus surge this fall … is to make a major campaign, which I would strongly support and so would my colleagues, a major campaign to get Americans tested for their vitamin D levels.” Then, those who don’t have adequate levels can take supplements or otherwise work to improve them.

“The easiest solution is not yet another genetic vaccine, or low doses of a genetic vaccine. But ‘hey, let’s get everybody’s vitamin D levels up.’ It’s pennies. It’s cheap. It’s off patent. Sorry, pharma doesn’t make any money at it, but that’s where we see it.”