Dominion Offers to Testify in Michigan Amid Allegations Its Machines Can Switch Votes

December 10, 2020 Updated: December 11, 2020

Dominion Voting Systems offered to testify before the Michigan State Senate to defend its operations and voting machines.

John Poulos, the CEO of the company, wrote a letter to Senate Oversight Committee Chairman Ed McBroom this week that a company representative could testify next week on “the continuing malicious and widespread disinformation campaign” against Dominion, reported the Detroit Free Press.

“I appreciate the opportunity to correct the baseless and defamatory claims being made about our systems. They are harmful not only to Dominion, but also to the countless hardworking election officials across the State, as well all Michigan public officials elected through a fair process,” Poulos said.

The company has come under fire in recent weeks after President Donald Trump’s legal team and other lawyers said Dominion machines are compromised and questioned whether the firm has ties to foreign governments. It came after the Michigan GOP flagged the state’s Antrim County has having flipped 6,000 votes from Trump to Joe Biden, although Michigan’s secretary of state said it was due to software not being updated.

Michigan Republican House Oversight Committee Chairman Matt Hall said the company has not responded to him after repeated requests from the committee to testify.

“If they’re not true, then come in and tell your side of the story. Come to the Legislature and answer questions,” Hall said in reference to Dominion’s statements to media outlets disputing alleged election fraud and irregularities. “My goal, as I’ve said all along, is to restore confidence in the elections. That requires listening to people of all viewpoints.”

Hall threated to subpoena Poulos earlier this week.

McBroom, meanwhile, thanked Dominion for showing a willingness to testify.

“There has been much speculation regarding the reliability of Dominion’s technology, and we welcome the company’s participation in a public forum where they can help to dispel rumors and provide facts regarding their software and operations,” McBroom said in a statement.