DOJ, DHS, Pentagon Watchdogs Reviewing Jan. 6 Capitol Breach

January 15, 2021 Updated: January 15, 2021

The Justice Department’s Inspector General’s office and the Department of Defense’s internal watchdog will investigate how the agency and law enforcement agencies prepared for and responded to the U.S. Capitol breach on Jan. 6, according to officials in an announcement.

DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz confirmed on Friday that his office will review and “examine the role and activity of Department of Justice and its components in preparing for and responding to the events” during the Joint Session of Congress incident.

“The DOJ OIG review will include examining information relevant to the January 6 events that was available to DOJ and its components in advance of January 6; the extent to which such information was shared by DOJ and its components with the U.S. Capitol Police and other federal, state, and local agencies; and the role of DOJ personnel in responding to the events at the U.S. Capitol on January 6,” Horowitz wrote.

DOD Deputy Inspector General Marguerite Garrison confirmed that the agency will investigate the DOD’s response to requests about security during the Jan. 6 protests, what was requested of the agency, and whether appropriate actions taken during the events.

Furthermore, the Pentagon said it plans to “determine the DOD’s roles, responsibilities, and actions” before and after the breach. The Department of Homeland Security and other agencies will join the review, according to the letter.

Epoch Times Photo
National Guard soldiers maintain a watch over the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2021. (Joshua Roberts/Reuters)

U.S. Capitol Police previously said that they had prepared for only First Amendment activity at the Capitol. The breach triggered lockdowns in the House and Senate while sending congress members running for cover into secure areas.

Lawmakers in the House and Senate claimed President Donald Trump’s speech incited violence. Trump later told reporters that his speech “was appropriate.”

But the House moved to impeach Trump on Wednesday, with 10 Republicans joining all the Democrats.

Later, amid reports of protests and intelligence agency-produced bulletins claiming violence is being planned on Jan. 20, Trump called on his supporters to not engage in any lawbreaking.

“In light of reports of more demonstrations, I urge that there must be NO violence, NO lawbreaking, and NO vandalism of any kind,” Trump said. “That is not what I stand for and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers. Thank You.”

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel said that “violence has no place in our politics. Period.”

She added: “Let me be clear: Anyone who has malicious intent is not welcome in Washington, D.C. or in any other state capitol. The peaceful transition of power is one of our nation’s founding principles and is necessary for our country to move forward.”

The federal government, meanwhile, has deployed tens of thousands of National Guard members around D.C. and various state capital cities in the run-up to Jan. 20.