Charlottesville Crash Suspect Faces 5 Additional Charges

August 19, 2017 Updated: August 19, 2017    

James Alex Fields Jr., the suspect who allegedly drove his car into a group of people in Charlottesville, is facing additional charges, police said.

On Friday, Aug. 18, police said they charged Fields Jr. with five new felony charges, including malicious wounding and three counts of aggravated malicious wounding, CBS News reported.

The incident occurred amid a rally that drew white supremacists and other protesters.

In this handout provided by Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, James Alex Fields Jr. of Maumee, Ohio poses for a mugshot after he allegedly drove his car into a crowd of counter-protesters killing one and injuring 35 on Aug. 12, 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia. (Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images)
In this handout provided by Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail, James Alex Fields Jr. of Maumee, Ohio, poses for a mugshot after he allegedly drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters killing one and injuring 35 on Aug. 12, 2017, in Charlottesville, Va. (Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via Getty Images)

Fields is accused of killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and dozens more people. He was charged with second-degree murder and other charges. Heyer, a paralegal from Charlottesville, was protesting against the Unite the Right march on Saturday, Aug. 12,  when she was killed.

“She was there with her friends and she was trying to simply cross the street as the movement was breaking up that day and she was plowed down by a young man who was intent on spreading hate and thought hate would fix the world,” Heyer’s mother, Susan Bro, told NBC News last week.

(YouTube/screenshot)
(YouTube/screenshot)

On Friday, police said that those injured in the incident suffered serious, permanent injuries.

Photos emerged of Fields attending a supremacist rally wearing a shield before the attack. Reports said that Fields previously identified with Nazism and Adolf Hitler.

Police added that their investigation is ongoing, anticipating additional charges in the future.

Fields, of Ohio, had no prior connections to Charlottesville before the incident, police said.

A large crowd of people gathers ahead of the Boston Free Speech Rally in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., August 19, 2017. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith
A large crowd of people gathers ahead of the Boston Free Speech Rally in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., August 19, 2017. (Stephanie Keith/Reuters)

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said on Monday that the events in Charlottesville met the definition for domestic terrorism.

Charlottesville police fielded more than 250 calls on Saturday with reports of assault. Officers continue to take in new complaints, according to Charlottesville Police Chief Al Thomas.

President Donald Trump condemned the violence on both sides of the clashes.

“Anyone who acted criminally in this weekend’s racist violence, you will be held fully accountable,” Trump said.

“We condemn in the strongest possible terms the egregious display of hatred, bigotry, and violence. It has no place in America.”