Carson Huey-You, 11, Just Started College Classes at TCU

By Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.
August 28, 2013 Updated: July 18, 2015

Carson Huey-You, an 11-year-old in Texas, just started attending college at Texas Christian University.

He’s the youngest student on campus.

His major is physics, and he really likes math and science.

“The most exciting thing about being on campus is probably the difference between college and high school,” he told the Star-Telegram. “It’s a really big step. But I definitely do think thtat I can make that step and not trip.”

He wants to ultimately be a quantum physicist. 

Carson’s application was surprising to almost everyone involved. Dean of Admission Ray Brown told TCU360 that he can’t remember ever having someone so young submit an application, and Carson couldn’t apply online because the software isn’t set up to take anyone born in 2002.

Claretta Huey-You, his mother, said that she first noticed how gifted Carson was when he was three months old, when the eye doctor was impressed with his ability to concentrate. When he was two years old he started reading chapter books, and he started a math and reading program before he was three. He could add, subtract, multiply, and divide by age three, and he was working at an eighth grade level by the age of five.

Carson’s brother Cannan, 7, is studying at the eighth grade level, on track to graduate high school by age 13.

At TCU, Carson is taking 14 hours, and his class load includes calculus and physics. The school gave him a scholarship and a financial aid package.

Carson graduate in May from the Accommodated Learning Academy.

Outside of education, Carson’s hobbies include playing MineCraft, watching Star Wars and Mythbusters, and throwing the football around and playing basketball with his brother.

 

Zachary Stieber
Zachary Stieber
Reporter
Zachary Stieber covers U.S. news, including politics and court cases. He started at The Epoch Times as a New York City metro reporter.