California Governor Orders Widespread Closures of Businesses Over CCP Virus

July 13, 2020 Updated: July 13, 2020

California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered widespread closures in an attempt to curb the spread of the CCP virus following a recent surge in cases.

Last week, the state recorded its single-highest number of CCP (Chinese Communist Party) virus cases in a 24-hour period. The state’s average daily new cases reached more than 8,200 over the past week.

According to the governor, state health officials reported that 23 people died of COVID-19-related complications in the past day.

“We’ve made this point on multiple occasions and that is we’re moving back into a modification mode of our original stay-at-home order,” Newsom, a Democrat, said in a news conference on Monday.

The order means that indoor and outdoor bars must shut down, and restaurants were told to close indoor operations. Takeout is allowed under the measure.

Indoor operations at wineries, movie theaters, tasting rooms, family entertainment centers, museums, zoos, and cardrooms have to shut down.

Gyms, hair salons, offices in nonessential sectors, barbershops, and places of worship in 30 counties have to also close, he said.

“This continues to be a deadly disease,” Newsom said on Monday.  The order will take effect immediately, he said.

He noted that about 36 percent of the total ICU hospital beds are still available. But in some counties, less than 20 percent are available, the governor added.

“This continues to be a disease that puts people in our ICUs, in our hospitals and is currently putting a strain on our hospital system … We’re starting to see in some rural parts of the state an increase in ICU use that is generating some concern,” he said.

He didn’t include schools, which are slated to resume for in-person learning in a few weeks in much of the state. The state’s two largest school districts, San Diego and Los Angeles, said their students would start the school year with online learning.

Overall, California has reported more than 329,100 cases and more than 7,000 deaths, though infections are probably higher because some people don’t show symptoms and there’s a lack of testing.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.