Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel’s New Name Honors Former Gov. Carey

By Amelia Pang
Amelia Pang
Amelia Pang
Journalist
Amelia Pang is a New York-based, award-winning journalist. She covers local news and specializes in long-form, narrative writing. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in journalism and global studies from the New School. Subscribe to her newsletter: http://tinyletter.com/ameliapang
October 22, 2012 Updated: October 27, 2012
Mayor Michael Bloomberg Speaks at the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel, now renamed in honor of former Gov. Hugh L. Carey, on Oct. 22. Courtesy of Edward Reed.
Mayor Michael Bloomberg Speaks at the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel, now renamed in honor of former Gov. Hugh L. Carey, on Oct. 22. (Courtesy of Edward Reed)

NEW YORK—The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel has a new name: The Hugh L. Carey Tunnel.

The name was changed in honor of former Gov. Hugh Carey, whose epithet is “the man who saved New York.”

City, state, and MTA officials, and Carey’s relatives, gathered for the dedication ceremony Monday morning.

After serving seven terms as a congressman from Brooklyn, Carey served two terms as governor from 1975 to 1982, during New York City’s economic crisis when the city nearly declared bankruptcy.

He is remembered for his effective handling of the financial crisis, and the building of Battery Park City, the Jacob K. Javitz Convention Center, and the South Street Seaport. Carey passed away last year at age 92.

The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel was chosen because it connects southern Brooklyn to Lower Manhattan, “which is very fitting, Governor Carey was a son of Brooklyn,” Lt. Gov. Robert J. Duffy said.

Lt. Gov. Robert J. Duffy (L), former New York Gov. David Paterson (C), and Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) speak at the ceremony to rename the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel in honor of former Gov. Hugh L. Carey on Oct. 22. (Courtesy of Edward Reed.)
Lt. Gov. Robert J. Duffy (L), former New York Gov. David Paterson (C), and Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) speak at the ceremony to rename the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel in honor of former Gov. Hugh L. Carey on Oct. 22. (Courtesy of Edward Reed)

“Thousands of New Yorkers drive through this tunnel everyday. They’re thinking of work, home, school, their to-do list for that day, and from this day forward, if only for a moment, they’ll also think of Hugh Carey,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said.

Bloomberg also noted how Carey was the first governor to develop a capital plan for the MTA, “at a time when our subway system was literally falling apart. The New York standing today is literally a testament to Governor Carey’s foresight.”

“We want to make sure his name is not just remembered by civic leaders and historians, but millions of New Yorkers who will hear his name on a traffic report—hopefully people won’t be stuck in traffic and curse his name.”

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Amelia Pang
Journalist
Amelia Pang is a New York-based, award-winning journalist. She covers local news and specializes in long-form, narrative writing. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in journalism and global studies from the New School. Subscribe to her newsletter: http://tinyletter.com/ameliapang